UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The influence of antagonist standardization on wear.


Krejci, I; Albert, P; Lutz, F (1999). The influence of antagonist standardization on wear. Journal of Dental Research, 78(2):713-719.

Abstract

For differences among materials to be easily detected, low variation in in vitro wear tests is desirable. The working hypothesis of this paper was that antagonists standardized for shape and size and according to materials would show mean values similar to those found in natural, non-standardized cusps, and that standardization would lead to a reduction in mean variation. First, the shapes and sizes of palatal cusps of non-erupted human upper third molars were measured. The cusp cupola was best described by the formula y = 0.001 x2 and was symmetrical around the axis of rotation. Up to 200 microm of the y-axis, this parabola corresponded best to a ball radius of 0.6 mm. Based on this information, standardized antagonists were fabricated from both human enamel and steatite. Wear in the occlusal contact area and the wear of opposing conventional ceramic and fine hybrid composite, respectively, were quantified in a computerized chewing simulator. As a control, natural human enamel cusps were used. Standardization of enamel cusps did not reduce the variation of the resulting wear compared with that of non-standardized enamel antagonists. Furthermore, standardization led to significantly different results both in the antagonists and in the opposing restorative materials. Thus, natural enamel antagonists are preferable for the simulation of wear in the occlusal contact area.

For differences among materials to be easily detected, low variation in in vitro wear tests is desirable. The working hypothesis of this paper was that antagonists standardized for shape and size and according to materials would show mean values similar to those found in natural, non-standardized cusps, and that standardization would lead to a reduction in mean variation. First, the shapes and sizes of palatal cusps of non-erupted human upper third molars were measured. The cusp cupola was best described by the formula y = 0.001 x2 and was symmetrical around the axis of rotation. Up to 200 microm of the y-axis, this parabola corresponded best to a ball radius of 0.6 mm. Based on this information, standardized antagonists were fabricated from both human enamel and steatite. Wear in the occlusal contact area and the wear of opposing conventional ceramic and fine hybrid composite, respectively, were quantified in a computerized chewing simulator. As a control, natural human enamel cusps were used. Standardization of enamel cusps did not reduce the variation of the resulting wear compared with that of non-standardized enamel antagonists. Furthermore, standardization led to significantly different results both in the antagonists and in the opposing restorative materials. Thus, natural enamel antagonists are preferable for the simulation of wear in the occlusal contact area.

Citations

54 citations in Web of Science®
59 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 February 1999
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:19
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:0022-0345
Publisher DOI:10.1177/00220345990780021201
Related URLs:http://jdr.iadrjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/78/2/713
PubMed ID:10029471

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations