UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Increased fatigue resistance of respiratory muscles during exercise after respiratory muscle endurance training


Verges, S; Lenherr, O; Haner, A C; Schulz, C; Spengler, C M (2007). Increased fatigue resistance of respiratory muscles during exercise after respiratory muscle endurance training. American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 292(3):R1246-R1253.

Abstract

Respiratory muscle fatigue develops during exhaustive exercise and can limit exercise performance. Respiratory muscle training, in turn, can increase exercise performance. We investigated whether respiratory muscle endurance training (RMT) reduces exercise-induced inspiratory and expiratory muscle fatigue. Twenty-one healthy, male volunteers performed twenty 30-min sessions of either normocapnic hyperpnoea (n = 13) or sham training (CON, n = 8) over 4-5 wk. Before and after training, subjects performed a constant-load cycling test at 85% maximal power output to exhaustion (PRE(EXH), POST(EXH)). A further posttraining test was stopped at the pretraining duration (POST(ISO)) i.e., isotime. Before and after cycling, transdiaphragmatic pressure was measured during cervical magnetic stimulation to assess diaphragm contractility, and gastric pressure was measured during thoracic magnetic stimulation to assess abdominal muscle contractility. Overall, RMT did not reduce respiratory muscle fatigue. However, in subjects who developed >10% of diaphragm or abdominal muscle fatigue in PRE(EXH), fatigue was significantly reduced after RMT in POST(ISO) (inspiratory: -17 +/- 6% vs. -9 +/- 10%, P = 0.038, n = 9; abdominal: -19 +/- 10% vs. -11 +/- 11%, P = 0.038, n = 9), while sham training had no significant effect. Similarly, cycling endurance in POST(EXH) did not improve after RMT (P = 0.071), while a significant improvement was seen in the subgroup with >10% of diaphragm fatigue after PRE(EXH) (P = 0.017), but not in the sham training group (P = 0.674). However, changes in cycling endurance did not correlate with changes in respiratory muscle fatigue. In conclusion, RMT decreased the development of respiratory muscle fatigue during intensive exercise, but this change did not seem to improve cycling endurance.

Respiratory muscle fatigue develops during exhaustive exercise and can limit exercise performance. Respiratory muscle training, in turn, can increase exercise performance. We investigated whether respiratory muscle endurance training (RMT) reduces exercise-induced inspiratory and expiratory muscle fatigue. Twenty-one healthy, male volunteers performed twenty 30-min sessions of either normocapnic hyperpnoea (n = 13) or sham training (CON, n = 8) over 4-5 wk. Before and after training, subjects performed a constant-load cycling test at 85% maximal power output to exhaustion (PRE(EXH), POST(EXH)). A further posttraining test was stopped at the pretraining duration (POST(ISO)) i.e., isotime. Before and after cycling, transdiaphragmatic pressure was measured during cervical magnetic stimulation to assess diaphragm contractility, and gastric pressure was measured during thoracic magnetic stimulation to assess abdominal muscle contractility. Overall, RMT did not reduce respiratory muscle fatigue. However, in subjects who developed >10% of diaphragm or abdominal muscle fatigue in PRE(EXH), fatigue was significantly reduced after RMT in POST(ISO) (inspiratory: -17 +/- 6% vs. -9 +/- 10%, P = 0.038, n = 9; abdominal: -19 +/- 10% vs. -11 +/- 11%, P = 0.038, n = 9), while sham training had no significant effect. Similarly, cycling endurance in POST(EXH) did not improve after RMT (P = 0.071), while a significant improvement was seen in the subgroup with >10% of diaphragm fatigue after PRE(EXH) (P = 0.017), but not in the sham training group (P = 0.674). However, changes in cycling endurance did not correlate with changes in respiratory muscle fatigue. In conclusion, RMT decreased the development of respiratory muscle fatigue during intensive exercise, but this change did not seem to improve cycling endurance.

Citations

45 citations in Web of Science®
59 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

85 downloads since deposited on 18 Mar 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2007
Deposited On:18 Mar 2009 15:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:05
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:0363-6119
Publisher DOI:10.1152/ajpregu.00409.2006
PubMed ID:17068160
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-16029

Download

[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations