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Retrodifferentiation and rejuvenation of senescent monocytic cells requires PARP-1


Selle, A; Ullrich, O; Harnacke, K; Hass, R (2007). Retrodifferentiation and rejuvenation of senescent monocytic cells requires PARP-1. Experimental Gerontology, 42(6):554-562.

Abstract

Long-term culture of phorbol ester (TPA)-differentiated and growth-arrested human U937 leukemia cells was associated with expression of c-jun transcription factors and vimentin intermediate filaments until the cells entered a retrodifferentiation program. This retrodifferentiation process revealed a reversion of the senecent differentiated cells back to undifferentiated and proliferative active young cells. A significant protein ubiquitination was detectable before retrodifferentiation and rejuvenation indicating a proteolytic down-modulation of differentiation markers. Thus, proteolytic activity significantly increased during retrodifferentiation, however, proteasomal protein expression remained unaltered. In order to investigate proteasomal associates, (ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) expression progressively increased to maximal levels at the time of retrodifferentiation suggesting a possible regulatory association. Indeed, PARP-1 immunoprecipitations demonstrated a co-immunoprecipitation of proteolytically active 20S proteasome with maximal levels during retrodifferentiation. Inhibition of PARP and the proteasome by 3-aminobenzamide and MG-132, respectively, revealed about 90% of apoptotic cells by cell cycle analysis at the time of retrodifferentiation whereas control cells doubled. In contrast, a similar PARP and proteasome inhibition within 5d after TPA-induced differentiation demonstrated little if any apoptotic effects. More specifically, down-modulation of PARP-1 by an antisense PARP-1 vector construct underwent a rapid differentiation and aging and revealed no detectable retrodifferentiation in contrast to control vector-transfected U937 cells. In conclusion, retrodifferentiation of growth-arrested U937 monocytic cells requires proteasomal protein degradation and activity of PARP-1.

Long-term culture of phorbol ester (TPA)-differentiated and growth-arrested human U937 leukemia cells was associated with expression of c-jun transcription factors and vimentin intermediate filaments until the cells entered a retrodifferentiation program. This retrodifferentiation process revealed a reversion of the senecent differentiated cells back to undifferentiated and proliferative active young cells. A significant protein ubiquitination was detectable before retrodifferentiation and rejuvenation indicating a proteolytic down-modulation of differentiation markers. Thus, proteolytic activity significantly increased during retrodifferentiation, however, proteasomal protein expression remained unaltered. In order to investigate proteasomal associates, (ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) expression progressively increased to maximal levels at the time of retrodifferentiation suggesting a possible regulatory association. Indeed, PARP-1 immunoprecipitations demonstrated a co-immunoprecipitation of proteolytically active 20S proteasome with maximal levels during retrodifferentiation. Inhibition of PARP and the proteasome by 3-aminobenzamide and MG-132, respectively, revealed about 90% of apoptotic cells by cell cycle analysis at the time of retrodifferentiation whereas control cells doubled. In contrast, a similar PARP and proteasome inhibition within 5d after TPA-induced differentiation demonstrated little if any apoptotic effects. More specifically, down-modulation of PARP-1 by an antisense PARP-1 vector construct underwent a rapid differentiation and aging and revealed no detectable retrodifferentiation in contrast to control vector-transfected U937 cells. In conclusion, retrodifferentiation of growth-arrested U937 monocytic cells requires proteasomal protein degradation and activity of PARP-1.

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9 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2007
Deposited On:20 Mar 2009 10:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:05
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0531-5565
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2006.12.004
PubMed ID:17314023
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-16048

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