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The connecting tubule is the main site of the furosemide-induced urinary acidification by the vacuolar H+-ATPase


Kovacikova, J; Winter, C; Loffing-Cueni, D; Loffing, J; Finberg, K E; Lifton, R P; Hummler, E; Rossier, B; Wagner, C A (2006). The connecting tubule is the main site of the furosemide-induced urinary acidification by the vacuolar H+-ATPase. Kidney International, 70(10):1706-1716.

Abstract

Final urinary acidification is achieved by electrogenic vacuolar H(+)-ATPases expressed in acid-secretory intercalated cells (ICs) in the connecting tubule (CNT) and the cortical (CCD) and initial medullary collecting duct (MCD), respectively. Electrogenic Na(+) reabsorption via epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaCs) in the apical membrane of the segment-specific CNT and collecting duct cells may promote H(+)-ATPases-mediated proton secretion by creating a more lumen-negative voltage. The exact localization where this supposed functional interaction takes place is unknown. We used several mouse models performing renal clearance experiments and assessed the furosemide-induced urinary acidification. Increasing Na(+) delivery to the CNT and CCD by blocking Na(+) reabsorption in the thick ascending limb with furosemide enhanced urinary acidification and net acid excretion. This effect of furosemide was abolished with amiloride or benzamil blocking ENaC action. In mice deficient for the IC-specific B1 subunit of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, furosemide led to only a small urinary acidification. In contrast, in mice with a kidney-specific inactivation of the alpha subunit of ENaC in the CCD and MCD, but not in the CNT, furosemide alone and in combination with hydrochlorothiazide induced normal urinary acidification. These results suggest that the B1 vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit is necessary for the furosemide-induced acute urinary acidification. Loss of ENaC channels in the CCD and MCD does not affect this acidification. Thus, functional expression of ENaC channels in the CNT is sufficient for furosemide-stimulated urinary acidification and identifies the CNT as a major segment in electrogenic urinary acidification.

Final urinary acidification is achieved by electrogenic vacuolar H(+)-ATPases expressed in acid-secretory intercalated cells (ICs) in the connecting tubule (CNT) and the cortical (CCD) and initial medullary collecting duct (MCD), respectively. Electrogenic Na(+) reabsorption via epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaCs) in the apical membrane of the segment-specific CNT and collecting duct cells may promote H(+)-ATPases-mediated proton secretion by creating a more lumen-negative voltage. The exact localization where this supposed functional interaction takes place is unknown. We used several mouse models performing renal clearance experiments and assessed the furosemide-induced urinary acidification. Increasing Na(+) delivery to the CNT and CCD by blocking Na(+) reabsorption in the thick ascending limb with furosemide enhanced urinary acidification and net acid excretion. This effect of furosemide was abolished with amiloride or benzamil blocking ENaC action. In mice deficient for the IC-specific B1 subunit of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, furosemide led to only a small urinary acidification. In contrast, in mice with a kidney-specific inactivation of the alpha subunit of ENaC in the CCD and MCD, but not in the CNT, furosemide alone and in combination with hydrochlorothiazide induced normal urinary acidification. These results suggest that the B1 vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit is necessary for the furosemide-induced acute urinary acidification. Loss of ENaC channels in the CCD and MCD does not affect this acidification. Thus, functional expression of ENaC channels in the CNT is sufficient for furosemide-stimulated urinary acidification and identifies the CNT as a major segment in electrogenic urinary acidification.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2006
Deposited On:23 Mar 2009 16:44
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:05
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0085-2538
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:10.1038/sj.ki.5001851
PubMed ID:16985514
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-16075

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