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The effects of temperature on sodium hypochlorite short-term stability, pulp dissolution capacity, and antimicrobial efficacy.


Sirtes, G; Waltimo, T; Schaetzle, M; Zehnder, M (2005). The effects of temperature on sodium hypochlorite short-term stability, pulp dissolution capacity, and antimicrobial efficacy. Journal of Endodontics (JOE), 31(9):669-671.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test some effects of preheating NaOCl solutions using a commercially available syringe heating device. Irrigating solution temperatures in 10-ml syringes were measured. Stability of 5.25, 2.62, and 1% NaOCl solutions for 60 min at 20, 45, and 60 degrees C was assessed using iodine/thiosulfate titration. Human pulp tissue dissolution capacity of a 1% NaOCl solution was gauged at the latter temperatures, and compared to corresponding values with a 5.25% solution at 20 degrees C. Killing efficacy of diluted NaOCl solutions against 48-h incubations of Enterococcus feacalis ATCC 29212 was compared at 45 degrees C and 20 degrees C. Using the heating device, a 20 degrees C solution reached 45 degrees C and 60 degrees C in 7 and 20 min, respectively. Solutions remained stable during the observation period. The 1% NaOCl solution at 45 degrees C dissolved pulp tissues as effectively as the 5.25% solution at 20 degrees C, while the 60 degrees C/1% solution was significantly more effective (p < 0.05). A 100-fold increase in killing efficacy was observed between corresponding NaOCl solutions at 20 degrees C and 45 degrees C.

The purpose of this study was to test some effects of preheating NaOCl solutions using a commercially available syringe heating device. Irrigating solution temperatures in 10-ml syringes were measured. Stability of 5.25, 2.62, and 1% NaOCl solutions for 60 min at 20, 45, and 60 degrees C was assessed using iodine/thiosulfate titration. Human pulp tissue dissolution capacity of a 1% NaOCl solution was gauged at the latter temperatures, and compared to corresponding values with a 5.25% solution at 20 degrees C. Killing efficacy of diluted NaOCl solutions against 48-h incubations of Enterococcus feacalis ATCC 29212 was compared at 45 degrees C and 20 degrees C. Using the heating device, a 20 degrees C solution reached 45 degrees C and 60 degrees C in 7 and 20 min, respectively. Solutions remained stable during the observation period. The 1% NaOCl solution at 45 degrees C dissolved pulp tissues as effectively as the 5.25% solution at 20 degrees C, while the 60 degrees C/1% solution was significantly more effective (p < 0.05). A 100-fold increase in killing efficacy was observed between corresponding NaOCl solutions at 20 degrees C and 45 degrees C.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 September 2005
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:19
Publisher:American Association of Endodontists
ISSN:0099-2399
Publisher DOI:10.1097/01.don.0000153846.62144.d2
Related URLs:http://www.jendodon.com/article/PIIS0099239906610686/abstract
PubMed ID:16123703

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