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Step-by-step description of a rotary root canal preparation technique.


Schrader, C; Ackermann, M; Barbakow, F (1999). Step-by-step description of a rotary root canal preparation technique. International Endodontic Journal, 32(4):312-320.

Abstract

CLINICAL TECHNIQUE: Since the introduction of nickel-titanium in endodontics, several canal preparation techniques involving the use of rotary instruments have become popular. Such engine-driven rotary instruments rotate between 150 and 2000 r.p.m. and may be high or low torque orientated. This paper describes one such engine-driven system called the ProFile technique. The instruments are of a different specification to that used for conventional endodontic files and reamers. This paper describes a technique employed by the Division of Endodontology, Zurich Dental School, in a step-by-step procedure using primarily photographs of radiographs. The intention is to give any interested clinician a better idea of the technique using radiographs taken from both the buccolingual (clinical) perspective and the mesiodistal projection. Basically, the technique involves preparing the coronal portion of the root canal using Gates-Glidden burs and the ProFile instruments. Only when any constricting coronal parts of the canals have been removed is the working length established using conventional files. Finally, the apical part of the canal is prepared using only the ProFile instruments. Three clinical cases are also briefly described, in order to illustrate the potential of the technique in cases treated generally by clinicians.

CLINICAL TECHNIQUE: Since the introduction of nickel-titanium in endodontics, several canal preparation techniques involving the use of rotary instruments have become popular. Such engine-driven rotary instruments rotate between 150 and 2000 r.p.m. and may be high or low torque orientated. This paper describes one such engine-driven system called the ProFile technique. The instruments are of a different specification to that used for conventional endodontic files and reamers. This paper describes a technique employed by the Division of Endodontology, Zurich Dental School, in a step-by-step procedure using primarily photographs of radiographs. The intention is to give any interested clinician a better idea of the technique using radiographs taken from both the buccolingual (clinical) perspective and the mesiodistal projection. Basically, the technique involves preparing the coronal portion of the root canal using Gates-Glidden burs and the ProFile instruments. Only when any constricting coronal parts of the canals have been removed is the working length established using conventional files. Finally, the apical part of the canal is prepared using only the ProFile instruments. Three clinical cases are also briefly described, in order to illustrate the potential of the technique in cases treated generally by clinicians.

Citations

8 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 August 1999
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:19
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0143-2885
Publisher DOI:10.1046/j.1365-2591.1999.00217.x
PubMed ID:10551123

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