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Multiple bilateral asymmetric deficiency of trunk muscles


Beer, G M; Goebel, H H; Micilic-Probst, D; Groscurth, P; Manestar, M (2009). Multiple bilateral asymmetric deficiency of trunk muscles. European Journal of Plastic Surgery, 32(4):199-203.

Abstract

Trunk muscles are an important source for pedicled and free flaps in reconstructive surgery. Unilateral deficiencies of trunk muscles are well known, either isolated or as part of Poland’s syndrome. Bilateral muscular deficiencies and a “bilateral Poland anomaly” have also been sporadically
reported, but this is rare. We report on an 82-year-old
male cadaver with clinically obscure, asymmetric bilateral
deficiencies of the majority of trunk muscles. There was a
history of acute poliomyelitis in childhood. Histological
examination of representative muscle samples of the trunk
showed extensive muscle atrophy with fat and connective
tissue replacement. This was compatible with the prior
diagnosis of poliomyelitis. However, representative sections
of the spinal cord failed to reveal the antecedent poliomyelitis. The possibility of subclinical bilateral deficiencies of trunk muscles has to be taken into account in patients with ahistory of poliomyelitis when planning reconstructions in cases of regional pedicled muscle transfers or free microvascular tissue transfers in reconstructive surgery.

Trunk muscles are an important source for pedicled and free flaps in reconstructive surgery. Unilateral deficiencies of trunk muscles are well known, either isolated or as part of Poland’s syndrome. Bilateral muscular deficiencies and a “bilateral Poland anomaly” have also been sporadically
reported, but this is rare. We report on an 82-year-old
male cadaver with clinically obscure, asymmetric bilateral
deficiencies of the majority of trunk muscles. There was a
history of acute poliomyelitis in childhood. Histological
examination of representative muscle samples of the trunk
showed extensive muscle atrophy with fat and connective
tissue replacement. This was compatible with the prior
diagnosis of poliomyelitis. However, representative sections
of the spinal cord failed to reveal the antecedent poliomyelitis. The possibility of subclinical bilateral deficiencies of trunk muscles has to be taken into account in patients with ahistory of poliomyelitis when planning reconstructions in cases of regional pedicled muscle transfers or free microvascular tissue transfers in reconstructive surgery.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Surgical Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2009
Deposited On:03 Mar 2009 16:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:05
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0930-343X
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00238-008-0308-1
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-16226

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