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Quantitative histological features and ultrastructure of opercula of human teeth showing normal and delayed eruption.


Verma, D K; Nair, P N R; Luder, H U (2005). Quantitative histological features and ultrastructure of opercula of human teeth showing normal and delayed eruption. Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, 34(2):109-115.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Failure of eruption of human permanent molars has been attributed to opercular lesions, although comparisons with specimens from normally erupting teeth are scarce. The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyse opercula associated with normal and delayed tooth eruption. METHOD: Twenty opercula covering permanent molars delayed in eruption were obtained from 13 patients aged 7.3-18.1 years. Six opercula from normally erupting molars of five 7.3-17.5-year-old subjects served as controls. Specimens were analysed light and electron microscopically and morphometrically. RESULTS: In addition to features recognized previously, prominent numbers of nerves, high endothelial-like venules and mast cells were observed. Ultrastructurally, large multinucleated cells did not reveal cell boundaries running between the nuclei, and mast cells seemed belonging to the MC(TC)-type. None of the features differed significantly between opercula from cases of delayed and normal tooth eruption. CONCLUSIONS: Disturbances of tooth eruption that are attributed to opercular lesions may represent retentions resulting from the failure of the eruption mechanism, rather than impactions because of a physical barrier.

BACKGROUND: Failure of eruption of human permanent molars has been attributed to opercular lesions, although comparisons with specimens from normally erupting teeth are scarce. The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyse opercula associated with normal and delayed tooth eruption. METHOD: Twenty opercula covering permanent molars delayed in eruption were obtained from 13 patients aged 7.3-18.1 years. Six opercula from normally erupting molars of five 7.3-17.5-year-old subjects served as controls. Specimens were analysed light and electron microscopically and morphometrically. RESULTS: In addition to features recognized previously, prominent numbers of nerves, high endothelial-like venules and mast cells were observed. Ultrastructurally, large multinucleated cells did not reveal cell boundaries running between the nuclei, and mast cells seemed belonging to the MC(TC)-type. None of the features differed significantly between opercula from cases of delayed and normal tooth eruption. CONCLUSIONS: Disturbances of tooth eruption that are attributed to opercular lesions may represent retentions resulting from the failure of the eruption mechanism, rather than impactions because of a physical barrier.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Institute of Oral Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 February 2005
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:19
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0904-2512
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1600-0714.2004.00251.x
PubMed ID:15641991

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