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Electron-microscopic demonstration of proline-rich proteins, statherin, and histatins in acquired enamel pellicles in vitro.


Schüpbach, P; Oppenheim, F G; Lendenmann, U; Lamkin, M S; Yao, Y; Guggenheim, B (2001). Electron-microscopic demonstration of proline-rich proteins, statherin, and histatins in acquired enamel pellicles in vitro. European Journal of Oral Sciences, 109(1):60-68.

Abstract

Proline-rich proteins (PRPs), histatins, and statherin are salivary proteins that exhibit high affinities for hydroxyapatite surfaces. In vitro experiments with parotid submandibular/sublingual or whole saliva have shown these proteins to adsorb selectively to tooth surfaces. This investigation focuses on the histo-morphological identification of PRPs, histatins, and statherin in acquired enamel pellicles. Synthetic hydroxyapatite or bovine enamel were exposed to glandular secretions, and whole saliva and pellicle precursor proteins were identified immunohistologically by electron microscopy. Results obtained by back-scattered scanning electron microscopy showed these proteins to be present in pellicles. Pellicles displayed a distinct structure consisting of a sponge-like meshwork of microglobules. Interconnections between structural elements were identified in submandibular/sublingual and whole saliva pellicles only. Transmission electron microscopy of pellicles formed on bovine enamel surfaces revealed a tendency for preferential localization of precursor proteins within the protein film. Since the data showed the presence of pellicle precursors in pellicles derived both from glandular secretions and from whole saliva, it is likely that PRPs, histatins, and statherin are integral components of acquired enamel pellicles in vivo.

Proline-rich proteins (PRPs), histatins, and statherin are salivary proteins that exhibit high affinities for hydroxyapatite surfaces. In vitro experiments with parotid submandibular/sublingual or whole saliva have shown these proteins to adsorb selectively to tooth surfaces. This investigation focuses on the histo-morphological identification of PRPs, histatins, and statherin in acquired enamel pellicles. Synthetic hydroxyapatite or bovine enamel were exposed to glandular secretions, and whole saliva and pellicle precursor proteins were identified immunohistologically by electron microscopy. Results obtained by back-scattered scanning electron microscopy showed these proteins to be present in pellicles. Pellicles displayed a distinct structure consisting of a sponge-like meshwork of microglobules. Interconnections between structural elements were identified in submandibular/sublingual and whole saliva pellicles only. Transmission electron microscopy of pellicles formed on bovine enamel surfaces revealed a tendency for preferential localization of precursor proteins within the protein film. Since the data showed the presence of pellicle precursors in pellicles derived both from glandular secretions and from whole saliva, it is likely that PRPs, histatins, and statherin are integral components of acquired enamel pellicles in vivo.

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41 citations in Web of Science®
45 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Institute of Oral Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 February 2001
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:19
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0909-8836
Publisher DOI:10.1034/j.1600-0722.2001.00925.x
PubMed ID:11330936

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