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Multimass spherical structure models for N-body simulations


Zemp, M; Moore, B; Stadel, J; Carollo, C M; Madau, P (2008). Multimass spherical structure models for N-body simulations. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 386(3):1543-1556.

Abstract

We present a simple and efficient method to set up spherical structure models for N-body simulations with a multimass technique. This technique reduces by a substantial factor the computer run time needed in order to resolve a given scale as compared to single-mass models. It therefore allows to resolve smaller scales in N-body simulations for a given computer run time. Here, we present several models with an effective resolution of up to 1.68 × 109 particles within their virial radius which are stable over cosmologically relevant time-scales. As an application, we confirm the theoretical prediction by Dehnen that in mergers of collisionless structures like dark matter haloes always the cusp of the steepest progenitor is preserved. We model each merger progenitor with an effective number of particles of approximately 108 particles. We also find that in a core–core merger the central density approximately doubles whereas in the cusp–cusp case the central density only increases by approximately 50 per cent. This may suggest that the central regions of flat structures are better protected and get less energy input through the merger process.

We present a simple and efficient method to set up spherical structure models for N-body simulations with a multimass technique. This technique reduces by a substantial factor the computer run time needed in order to resolve a given scale as compared to single-mass models. It therefore allows to resolve smaller scales in N-body simulations for a given computer run time. Here, we present several models with an effective resolution of up to 1.68 × 109 particles within their virial radius which are stable over cosmologically relevant time-scales. As an application, we confirm the theoretical prediction by Dehnen that in mergers of collisionless structures like dark matter haloes always the cusp of the steepest progenitor is preserved. We model each merger progenitor with an effective number of particles of approximately 108 particles. We also find that in a core–core merger the central density approximately doubles whereas in the cusp–cusp case the central density only increases by approximately 50 per cent. This may suggest that the central regions of flat structures are better protected and get less energy input through the merger process.

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25 citations in Web of Science®
23 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute for Computational Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Language:English
Date:May 2008
Deposited On:10 Mar 2009 17:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:06
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0035-8711
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13126.x
Related URLs:http://arxiv.org/abs/0710.3189
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-16554

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