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Additive benefit of higher testosterone levels and vitamin D plus calcium supplementation in regard to fall risk reduction among older men and women


Bischoff-Ferrari, H A; Orav, E J; Dawson-Hughes, B (2008). Additive benefit of higher testosterone levels and vitamin D plus calcium supplementation in regard to fall risk reduction among older men and women. Osteoporosis International, 19(9):1307-1314.

Abstract

Higher physiologic testosterone levels among community dwelling older men and women may protect against falls, and this benefit may be further increased among those taking additional vitamin D plus calcium. INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study is to investigate sex hormone levels and fall risk in older men and women. METHODS: One hundred and ninety-nine men and 246 women age 65+ living at home were followed for 3 years after baseline assessment of sex hormones. Analyses controlled for several covariates, including baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D, sex hormone binding globulin, and vitamin D plus calcium treatment (vitD+cal). RESULTS: Compared to the lowest quartile, men and women in the highest quartile of total testosterone had a decreased odds of falling (men: OR = 0.22; 95% CI [0.07,0.72]/ women: OR = 0.34; 95% CI [0.14,0.83]); if those individuals also took vitD+cal, the fall reduction was enhanced (men: OR = 0.16; 95% CI [0.03,0.90] / women: OR = 0.15; 95% CI [0.04,0.57]). Similarly, women in the top quartile of dihydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) had a lower risk of falling (OR = 0.39; 95% CI [0.16,0.93]). Other sex hormones and SHBG did not predict falling in men or women. CONCLUSIONS: Higher testosterone levels in both genders and higher DHEA-S levels in women predicted a more than 60% lower risk of falling. With vitD+cal, the anti-fall benefit of higher physiologic testosterone levels is enhanced from 78% to 84% among men and from 66% to 85% among women.

Higher physiologic testosterone levels among community dwelling older men and women may protect against falls, and this benefit may be further increased among those taking additional vitamin D plus calcium. INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study is to investigate sex hormone levels and fall risk in older men and women. METHODS: One hundred and ninety-nine men and 246 women age 65+ living at home were followed for 3 years after baseline assessment of sex hormones. Analyses controlled for several covariates, including baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D, sex hormone binding globulin, and vitamin D plus calcium treatment (vitD+cal). RESULTS: Compared to the lowest quartile, men and women in the highest quartile of total testosterone had a decreased odds of falling (men: OR = 0.22; 95% CI [0.07,0.72]/ women: OR = 0.34; 95% CI [0.14,0.83]); if those individuals also took vitD+cal, the fall reduction was enhanced (men: OR = 0.16; 95% CI [0.03,0.90] / women: OR = 0.15; 95% CI [0.04,0.57]). Similarly, women in the top quartile of dihydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) had a lower risk of falling (OR = 0.39; 95% CI [0.16,0.93]). Other sex hormones and SHBG did not predict falling in men or women. CONCLUSIONS: Higher testosterone levels in both genders and higher DHEA-S levels in women predicted a more than 60% lower risk of falling. With vitD+cal, the anti-fall benefit of higher physiologic testosterone levels is enhanced from 78% to 84% among men and from 66% to 85% among women.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Rheumatology Clinic and Institute of Physical Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:27 Feb 2009 07:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:07
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0937-941X
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00198-008-0573-7
PubMed ID:18351428
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-16931

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