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Vitamin and Trace Mineral Deficiency and Excess


Russell, R M; Suter, P M (2008). Vitamin and Trace Mineral Deficiency and Excess. In: Fauci, A S. Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine. Stuttgart: Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft (WVG), 441-450.

Abstract

Chapter 71. Vitamin and Trace Mineral Deficiency and Excess

Sections: Vitamin and Trace Mineral Deficiency and Excess: Introduction, Vitamins, Thiamine (Vitamin B1), Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Niacin (Vitamin B3), Pyridoxine (Vitamin B6), Folate, Vitamin B12, Vitamin C, Biotin, Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5), Choline, Flavonoids, Vitamin A, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Minerals, Introduction, Calcium, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Chromium, Magnesium, Fluoride, Manganese, and Ultratrace Elements, Further Readings.

Topics Discussed: avitaminosis; mineral deficiency; mineral excess; vitamins.

Excerpt: " Vitamins and trace minerals are required constituents of the human diet since they are either inadequately synthesized or not synthesized in the human body. Only small amounts of these substances are needed for carrying out essential biochemical reactions (e.g., acting as coenzymes or prosthetic groups). Overt vitamin or trace mineral deficiencies are rare in Western countries due to a plentiful, varied, and inexpensive food supply; however, multiple nutrient deficiencies may appear together in persons who are chronically ill or alcoholic. Moreover, subclinical vitamin and trace mineral deficiencies, as diagnosed by laboratory testing, are quite common in the normal population—especially in the geriatric age group...."

Chapter 71. Vitamin and Trace Mineral Deficiency and Excess

Sections: Vitamin and Trace Mineral Deficiency and Excess: Introduction, Vitamins, Thiamine (Vitamin B1), Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Niacin (Vitamin B3), Pyridoxine (Vitamin B6), Folate, Vitamin B12, Vitamin C, Biotin, Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5), Choline, Flavonoids, Vitamin A, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Minerals, Introduction, Calcium, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Chromium, Magnesium, Fluoride, Manganese, and Ultratrace Elements, Further Readings.

Topics Discussed: avitaminosis; mineral deficiency; mineral excess; vitamins.

Excerpt: " Vitamins and trace minerals are required constituents of the human diet since they are either inadequately synthesized or not synthesized in the human body. Only small amounts of these substances are needed for carrying out essential biochemical reactions (e.g., acting as coenzymes or prosthetic groups). Overt vitamin or trace mineral deficiencies are rare in Western countries due to a plentiful, varied, and inexpensive food supply; however, multiple nutrient deficiencies may appear together in persons who are chronically ill or alcoholic. Moreover, subclinical vitamin and trace mineral deficiencies, as diagnosed by laboratory testing, are quite common in the normal population—especially in the geriatric age group...."

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:03 Mar 2009 11:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:09
Publisher:Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft (WVG)
Number:17th Edition
ISBN:978-0-07-146633-2
Related URLs:http://www.accessmedicine.com/preface.aspx?resourceID=4

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