UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Temporal characteristics of audiovisual information processing


Fuhrmann Alpert, G; Hein, G; Tsai, N; Naumer, M J; Knight, R T (2008). Temporal characteristics of audiovisual information processing. Journal of Neuroscience, 28(20):5344-5349.

Abstract

In complex natural environments, auditory and visual information often have to be processed simultaneously. Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies focused on the spatial localization of brain areas involved in audiovisual (AV) information processing, but the temporal characteristics of AV information flow in these regions remained unclear. In this study, we used fMRI and a novel information-theoretic approach to study the flow of AV sensory information. Subjects passively perceived sounds and images of objects presented either alone or simultaneously. Applying the measure of mutual information, we computed for each voxel the latency in which the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal had the highest information content about the preceding stimulus. The results indicate that, after AV stimulation, the earliest informative activity occurs in right Heschl's gyrus, left primary visual cortex, and the posterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus, which is known as a region involved in object-related AV integration. Informative activity in the anterior portion of superior temporal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, right occipital cortex, and inferior frontal cortex was found at a later latency. Moreover, AV presentation resulted in shorter latencies in multiple cortical areas compared with isolated auditory or visual presentation. The results provide evidence for bottom-up processing from primary sensory areas into higher association areas during AV integration in humans and suggest that AV presentation shortens processing time in early sensory cortices.

In complex natural environments, auditory and visual information often have to be processed simultaneously. Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies focused on the spatial localization of brain areas involved in audiovisual (AV) information processing, but the temporal characteristics of AV information flow in these regions remained unclear. In this study, we used fMRI and a novel information-theoretic approach to study the flow of AV sensory information. Subjects passively perceived sounds and images of objects presented either alone or simultaneously. Applying the measure of mutual information, we computed for each voxel the latency in which the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal had the highest information content about the preceding stimulus. The results indicate that, after AV stimulation, the earliest informative activity occurs in right Heschl's gyrus, left primary visual cortex, and the posterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus, which is known as a region involved in object-related AV integration. Informative activity in the anterior portion of superior temporal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, right occipital cortex, and inferior frontal cortex was found at a later latency. Moreover, AV presentation resulted in shorter latencies in multiple cortical areas compared with isolated auditory or visual presentation. The results provide evidence for bottom-up processing from primary sensory areas into higher association areas during AV integration in humans and suggest that AV presentation shortens processing time in early sensory cortices.

Citations

20 citations in Web of Science®
30 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

62 downloads since deposited on 02 Mar 2009
7 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:14 May 2008
Deposited On:02 Mar 2009 15:46
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:09
Publisher:Society for Neuroscience
ISSN:0270-6474
Additional Information:Holder of copyright: The Society for Neuroscience
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5039-07.2008
PubMed ID:18480290
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-17247

Download

[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations