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Dicarbonyl-nitrosyl-complexes of rhenium (Re) and technetium (Tc), a potentially new class of compounds for the direct radiolabeling of biomolecules


Rattat, D; Schubiger, P A; Berke, H G; Schmalle, H W; Alberto, R (2001). Dicarbonyl-nitrosyl-complexes of rhenium (Re) and technetium (Tc), a potentially new class of compounds for the direct radiolabeling of biomolecules. Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, 16(4):339-343.

Abstract

Re- and Tc-complexes of the oxidation state (+I) offer a useful synthetic pool for the labeling of biomolecules due to their co-ordination properties and stability, which are superior to compounds of the oxidation state (+V). Based on the results for Tc-tricarbonyl complexes it was the topic of this work to develop an access to similar but higher charged compounds, which could be performed by replacing a neutral [CO]-group by a [NO](+)-group. The resulting Re(I)- and Tc(I)-dicarbonyl-nitrosyl complexes, such as [N(CH2CH3)4][ReX3(CO)2(NO)], show a tendency for co-ordination at carboxylic and amine groups of biomolecules (X = Br, Cl). This was shown with picolinic acid (H-pic), a suitable model for amino acids, forming the neutral complex [ReX(pic)(CO)2(NO)]. In a similar fashion conjugation of [188Re(CO)2(NO)](2+)- or [99mTc(CO)2(NO)](2+)-compounds to proteins or antibodies is feasible. This approach opens a way to a potentially new class of radiopharmaceuticals.

Re- and Tc-complexes of the oxidation state (+I) offer a useful synthetic pool for the labeling of biomolecules due to their co-ordination properties and stability, which are superior to compounds of the oxidation state (+V). Based on the results for Tc-tricarbonyl complexes it was the topic of this work to develop an access to similar but higher charged compounds, which could be performed by replacing a neutral [CO]-group by a [NO](+)-group. The resulting Re(I)- and Tc(I)-dicarbonyl-nitrosyl complexes, such as [N(CH2CH3)4][ReX3(CO)2(NO)], show a tendency for co-ordination at carboxylic and amine groups of biomolecules (X = Br, Cl). This was shown with picolinic acid (H-pic), a suitable model for amino acids, forming the neutral complex [ReX(pic)(CO)2(NO)]. In a similar fashion conjugation of [188Re(CO)2(NO)](2+)- or [99mTc(CO)2(NO)](2+)-compounds to proteins or antibodies is feasible. This approach opens a way to a potentially new class of radiopharmaceuticals.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:1 August 2001
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:20
Publisher:Mary Ann Liebert
ISSN:1084-9785
Additional Information:This is a copy of an article published in the Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals © 2001 copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.; Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals is available online at: http://online.liebertpub.com
Publisher DOI:10.1089/108497801753131426
PubMed ID:11603005
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-1726

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