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Hydride transfer reactivity of tetrakis(trimethylphosphine)(hydrido)(nitrosyl)molybdenum(0).


Zhao, Yin; Schmalle, H W; Fox, T; Blacque, Olivier; Berke, Heinz (2006). Hydride transfer reactivity of tetrakis(trimethylphosphine)(hydrido)(nitrosyl)molybdenum(0). Dalton Transactions, 1:73-85.

Abstract

The tetrakis(trimethylphosphine) molybdenum nitrosyl hydrido complex trans-Mo(PMe(3))(4)(H)(NO) (2) and the related deuteride complex trans-Mo(PMe(3))(4)(D)(NO) (2a) were prepared from trans-Mo(PMe(3))(4)(Cl)(NO) (1). From (2)H T(1 min) measurements and solid-state (2)H NMR the bond ionicities of 2a could be determined and were found to be 80.0% and 75.3%, respectively, indicating a very polar Mo--D bond. The enhanced hydridicity of 2 is reflected in its very high propensity to undergo hydride transfer reactions. 2 was thus reacted with acetone, acetophenone, and benzophenone to afford the corresponding alkoxide complexes trans-Mo(NO)(PMe(3))(4)(OCHR'R'') (R' = R'' = Me (3); R' = Me, R'' = Ph (4); R' = R'' = Ph (5)). The reaction of 2 with CO(2) led to the formation of the formato-O-complex Mo(NO)(OCHO)(PMe(3))(4) (6). The reaction of with HOSO(2)CF(3) produced the anion coordinated complex Mo(NO)(PMe(3))(4)(OSO(2)CF(3)) (7), and the reaction with [H(Et(2)O)(2)][BAr(F)(4)] with an excess of PMe(3) produced the pentakis(trimethylphosphine) coordinated compound [Mo(NO)(PMe(3))(5)][BAr(F)(4)] (8). Imine insertions into the Mo-H bond of 2 were also accomplished. PhCH[double bond, length as m-dash]NPh (N-benzylideneaniline) and C(10)H(7)CH=NPh (N-1-naphthylideneaniline) afforded the amido compounds Mo(NO)(PMe(3))(4)[NR'(CH(2)R'')] (R' = R'' = Ph (9), R' = Ph, R'' = naphthyl (11)). 9 could not be obtained in pure form, however, its structure was assigned by spectroscopic means. At room temperature 11 reacted further to lose one PMe(3) forming 12 (Mo(NO)PMe(3))(3)[N(Ph)CH(2)C(10)H(6))]) with agostic stabilization. In a subsequent step oxidative addition of the agostic naphthyl C-H bond to the molybdenum centre occurred. Then hydrogen migration took place giving the chelate amine complex Mo(NO)(PMe(3))(3)[NH(Ph)(CH(2)C(10)H(6))] (15). The insertion reaction of 2 with C(10)H(7)N=CHPh led to formation of the agostic compound Mo(NO)(PMe(3))(3)[N(CH(2)Ph)(C(10)H(7))] (10). Based on the knowledge of facile formation of agostic compounds the catalytic hydrogenation of C(10)H(7)N=CHPh and PhN=CHC(10)H(7) with 2 (5 mol%) was tested. The best conversion rates were obtained in the presence of an excess of PMe(3), which were 18.4% and 100% for C(10)H(7)N=CHPh and PhN=CHC(10)H(7), respectively.

The tetrakis(trimethylphosphine) molybdenum nitrosyl hydrido complex trans-Mo(PMe(3))(4)(H)(NO) (2) and the related deuteride complex trans-Mo(PMe(3))(4)(D)(NO) (2a) were prepared from trans-Mo(PMe(3))(4)(Cl)(NO) (1). From (2)H T(1 min) measurements and solid-state (2)H NMR the bond ionicities of 2a could be determined and were found to be 80.0% and 75.3%, respectively, indicating a very polar Mo--D bond. The enhanced hydridicity of 2 is reflected in its very high propensity to undergo hydride transfer reactions. 2 was thus reacted with acetone, acetophenone, and benzophenone to afford the corresponding alkoxide complexes trans-Mo(NO)(PMe(3))(4)(OCHR'R'') (R' = R'' = Me (3); R' = Me, R'' = Ph (4); R' = R'' = Ph (5)). The reaction of 2 with CO(2) led to the formation of the formato-O-complex Mo(NO)(OCHO)(PMe(3))(4) (6). The reaction of with HOSO(2)CF(3) produced the anion coordinated complex Mo(NO)(PMe(3))(4)(OSO(2)CF(3)) (7), and the reaction with [H(Et(2)O)(2)][BAr(F)(4)] with an excess of PMe(3) produced the pentakis(trimethylphosphine) coordinated compound [Mo(NO)(PMe(3))(5)][BAr(F)(4)] (8). Imine insertions into the Mo-H bond of 2 were also accomplished. PhCH[double bond, length as m-dash]NPh (N-benzylideneaniline) and C(10)H(7)CH=NPh (N-1-naphthylideneaniline) afforded the amido compounds Mo(NO)(PMe(3))(4)[NR'(CH(2)R'')] (R' = R'' = Ph (9), R' = Ph, R'' = naphthyl (11)). 9 could not be obtained in pure form, however, its structure was assigned by spectroscopic means. At room temperature 11 reacted further to lose one PMe(3) forming 12 (Mo(NO)PMe(3))(3)[N(Ph)CH(2)C(10)H(6))]) with agostic stabilization. In a subsequent step oxidative addition of the agostic naphthyl C-H bond to the molybdenum centre occurred. Then hydrogen migration took place giving the chelate amine complex Mo(NO)(PMe(3))(3)[NH(Ph)(CH(2)C(10)H(6))] (15). The insertion reaction of 2 with C(10)H(7)N=CHPh led to formation of the agostic compound Mo(NO)(PMe(3))(3)[N(CH(2)Ph)(C(10)H(7))] (10). Based on the knowledge of facile formation of agostic compounds the catalytic hydrogenation of C(10)H(7)N=CHPh and PhN=CHC(10)H(7) with 2 (5 mol%) was tested. The best conversion rates were obtained in the presence of an excess of PMe(3), which were 18.4% and 100% for C(10)H(7)N=CHPh and PhN=CHC(10)H(7), respectively.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:7 January 2006
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:20
Publisher:Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN:1477-9226
Publisher DOI:10.1039/b511797f
PubMed ID:16357963

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