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Imported infectious disease and purpose of travel, Switzerland


Fenner, Lukas; Weber, Rainer; Steffen, Robert; Schlagenhauf, Patricia (2007). Imported infectious disease and purpose of travel, Switzerland. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 13(2):217-222.

Abstract

We evaluated the epidemiologic factors of patients seeking treatment for travel-associated illness from January 2004 through May 2005 at the University Hospital of Zurich. When comparing persons whose purpose of travel was visiting friends and relatives (VFR travelers; n = 121) with tourists and other travelers (n = 217), VFR travelers showed a distinct infectious disease and risk spectrum. VFR travelers were more likely to receive a diagnosis of malaria (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-7.3) or viral hepatitis (OR = 3.1, 95% CI 1.1-9) compared with other travelers but were less likely to seek pretravel advice (20% vs. 67%, p = 0.0001). However, proportionate rates of acute diarrhea were lower in VFR (173 vs. 364 per 1,000 ill returnees). Travel to sub-Saharan Africa contributed most to malaria in VFR travelers. In countries with large migrant populations, improved public health strategies are needed to reach VFR travelers.

We evaluated the epidemiologic factors of patients seeking treatment for travel-associated illness from January 2004 through May 2005 at the University Hospital of Zurich. When comparing persons whose purpose of travel was visiting friends and relatives (VFR travelers; n = 121) with tourists and other travelers (n = 217), VFR travelers showed a distinct infectious disease and risk spectrum. VFR travelers were more likely to receive a diagnosis of malaria (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-7.3) or viral hepatitis (OR = 3.1, 95% CI 1.1-9) compared with other travelers but were less likely to seek pretravel advice (20% vs. 67%, p = 0.0001). However, proportionate rates of acute diarrhea were lower in VFR (173 vs. 364 per 1,000 ill returnees). Travel to sub-Saharan Africa contributed most to malaria in VFR travelers. In countries with large migrant populations, improved public health strategies are needed to reach VFR travelers.

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49 citations in Web of Science®
54 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:February 2007
Deposited On:30 Mar 2009 09:52
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:09
Publisher:National Center for Infectious Diseases
ISSN:1080-6040
Official URL:http://www.cdc.gov/EID/content/13/2/217.htm
PubMed ID:17479882
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-17496

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