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A mutation in the silver gene leads to defects in melanosome biogenesis and alterations in the visual system in the zebrafish mutant fading vision.


Schonthaler, H B; Lampert, J M; von Lintig, J; Schwarz, H; Geisler, R; Neuhauss, S C F (2005). A mutation in the silver gene leads to defects in melanosome biogenesis and alterations in the visual system in the zebrafish mutant fading vision. Developmental Biology, 284(2):421-436.

Abstract

Forward genetic screens have been instrumental in defining molecular components of visual function. The zebrafish mutant fading vision (fdv) has been identified in such a screen due to defects in vision accompanied by hypopigmentation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and body melanocytes. The RPE forms the outer most layer of the retina, and its function is essential for vision. In fdv mutant larvae, the outer segments of photoreceptors are strongly reduced in length or absent due to defects in RPE cells. Ultrastructural analysis of RPE cells reveals dramatic cellular changes such as an absence of microvilli and vesicular inclusions. The retinoid profile is altered as judged by biochemical analysis, arguing for a partial block in visual pigment regeneration. Surprisingly, homozygous fdv vision mutants survive to adulthood and show, despite a persistence of the hypopigmentation, a partial recovery of retinal morphology. By positional cloning and subsequent morpholino knock-down, we identified a mutation in the silver gene as the molecular defect underlying the fdv phenotype. The Silver protein is required for intralumenal fibril formation in melanosomes by amylogenic cleavage. Our data reveal an unexpected link between melanosome biogenesis and the visual system, undetectable in cell culture.

Forward genetic screens have been instrumental in defining molecular components of visual function. The zebrafish mutant fading vision (fdv) has been identified in such a screen due to defects in vision accompanied by hypopigmentation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and body melanocytes. The RPE forms the outer most layer of the retina, and its function is essential for vision. In fdv mutant larvae, the outer segments of photoreceptors are strongly reduced in length or absent due to defects in RPE cells. Ultrastructural analysis of RPE cells reveals dramatic cellular changes such as an absence of microvilli and vesicular inclusions. The retinoid profile is altered as judged by biochemical analysis, arguing for a partial block in visual pigment regeneration. Surprisingly, homozygous fdv vision mutants survive to adulthood and show, despite a persistence of the hypopigmentation, a partial recovery of retinal morphology. By positional cloning and subsequent morpholino knock-down, we identified a mutation in the silver gene as the molecular defect underlying the fdv phenotype. The Silver protein is required for intralumenal fibril formation in melanosomes by amylogenic cleavage. Our data reveal an unexpected link between melanosome biogenesis and the visual system, undetectable in cell culture.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Life Sciences
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:15 August 2005
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:13
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:12
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0012-1606
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.ydbio.2005.06.001
PubMed ID:16024012
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-177

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