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[Consensus report: tissue handling in suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and other spongiform encephalopathies (prion diseases) in the human. European Union Biomed-1 Concerted Action]


Budka, H; Aguzzi, A; Brown, P; Brucher, J M; Bugiani, O; Collinge, J; Diringer, H; Gullotta, F; Haltia, M; Hauw, J J; Ironside, J W; Kretzschmar, H A; Lantos, P L; Masullo, C; Pocchiari, M; Schlote, W; Tateishi, J; Will, R G (1996). [Consensus report: tissue handling in suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and other spongiform encephalopathies (prion diseases) in the human. European Union Biomed-1 Concerted Action]. Der Pathologe, 17(2):171-175.

Abstract

Despite many sensational and intimidating reports in the mass media, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (prion diseases) are not contagious in the usual sense. Successful transmission requires both specific material (an affected individual's tissue, from or adjacent to CNS) and specific modes (mainly penetrating contact with the recipient). Nevertheless, specific safety precautions are mandatory to avoid accidental transmission and to decontaminate any infectivity. The autopsy is essential for definite diagnosis of these disorders. Recommendations are given here for safe performance of the autopsy, for neuropathology service and appropriate decontamination; they are based on the current literature and on precautions taken in most laboratories experienced in handling tissue from transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In essence, special care must be taken to avoid penetrating wounds, possible contamination should be kept to a minimum, and potentially infectious material must be adequately decontaminated by specific means. The full English text of this Consensus Report was published in Brain Pathology 5: 319-322 (1995).

Despite many sensational and intimidating reports in the mass media, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (prion diseases) are not contagious in the usual sense. Successful transmission requires both specific material (an affected individual's tissue, from or adjacent to CNS) and specific modes (mainly penetrating contact with the recipient). Nevertheless, specific safety precautions are mandatory to avoid accidental transmission and to decontaminate any infectivity. The autopsy is essential for definite diagnosis of these disorders. Recommendations are given here for safe performance of the autopsy, for neuropathology service and appropriate decontamination; they are based on the current literature and on precautions taken in most laboratories experienced in handling tissue from transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In essence, special care must be taken to avoid penetrating wounds, possible contamination should be kept to a minimum, and potentially infectious material must be adequately decontaminated by specific means. The full English text of this Consensus Report was published in Brain Pathology 5: 319-322 (1995).

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8 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:1996
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:20
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0172-8113
PubMed ID:8650149

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