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Endoscopic narrow-band imaging-quantitative assessment of airway vascularity after lung transplantation


Irani, S; Thuer, I; Seifert, Burkhardt; Speich, R; Boehler, A (2009). Endoscopic narrow-band imaging-quantitative assessment of airway vascularity after lung transplantation. Journal of Biomedical Optics, 14(1):014010.

Abstract

In lung transplant recipients, the submucosal vascular plexus of the airway wall potentially represents one of the key structures of graft injury. Narrow band imaging is a novel endoscope technique that allows visual enhancement of the mucosa vasculature. It was our aim to investigate the ability of narrow-band imaging in combination with computerized image analysis to quantitatively assess airway vascularity in lung transplant recipients. In consecutive lung transplant recipients, in addition to the routine procedures, optical analysis of the main carina (autologous tissue) and the upper lobe carina (allogeneic tissue) were performed. From every site, three representative pictures were chosen. A total of 63 bronchoscopies were analyzed. The intraclass correlation coefficient (measure for test-retest reliability) of the three measurements were 0.69 and 0.74 for the main carina and the upper lobe carina, respectively. A mixed linear regression revealed increased vascularity in autologous tissue of patients with cystic fibrosis (p=0.06) and decreased vascularity in allogeneic tissue with time after transplantation (p=0.09). Endoscopic narrow-band imaging (NBI) in combination with computerized image analysis allows consistent assessment of airway vascularity in vivo. In lung transplant recipients, there might be differences in airway vascularity in both autologous and allogeneic large airways.

In lung transplant recipients, the submucosal vascular plexus of the airway wall potentially represents one of the key structures of graft injury. Narrow band imaging is a novel endoscope technique that allows visual enhancement of the mucosa vasculature. It was our aim to investigate the ability of narrow-band imaging in combination with computerized image analysis to quantitatively assess airway vascularity in lung transplant recipients. In consecutive lung transplant recipients, in addition to the routine procedures, optical analysis of the main carina (autologous tissue) and the upper lobe carina (allogeneic tissue) were performed. From every site, three representative pictures were chosen. A total of 63 bronchoscopies were analyzed. The intraclass correlation coefficient (measure for test-retest reliability) of the three measurements were 0.69 and 0.74 for the main carina and the upper lobe carina, respectively. A mixed linear regression revealed increased vascularity in autologous tissue of patients with cystic fibrosis (p=0.06) and decreased vascularity in allogeneic tissue with time after transplantation (p=0.09). Endoscopic narrow-band imaging (NBI) in combination with computerized image analysis allows consistent assessment of airway vascularity in vivo. In lung transplant recipients, there might be differences in airway vascularity in both autologous and allogeneic large airways.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:27 Mar 2009 15:37
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:11
Publisher:Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
ISSN:1083-3668
Additional Information:Copyright 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic electronic or print reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.
Publisher DOI:10.1117/1.3076189
PubMed ID:19256698
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-17990

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