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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-18077

Mnich, C D; Hoek, K S; Oberholzer, P A; Seifert, B; Hafner, J; Dummer, R; Mihic, D (2007). Reduced pSmad2 immunodetection correlates with increased primary melanoma thickness. Melanoma Research, 17(2):131-136.

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Abstract

Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive of cutaneous neoplasms. Identifying patients with an increased risk for the development of metastases is critical. This study investigates phospho-Smad2, a central factor of the transforming growth factor beta pathway, on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 60 primary cutaneous melanomas (Breslow >1 mm), for its candidacy for being a prognostic marker in primary cutaneous melanoma. Phospho-Smad2 positivity was assessed for correlation with clinical parameters including Breslow index, melanoma type, survival, development of metastases, sentinel lymph node status and age. Phospho-Smad2 positivity was not associated with survival or development of metastases, suggesting that it would not be a useful prognostic marker. Despite this, we found phospho-Smad2 positivity to be correlated with low tumour thickness, indicating that as the primary tumour grows there is an increased inhibition of transforming growth factor beta signalling resulting in suppressed Smad2 phosphorylation. Additionally, phosphorylation of Smad2 in neighbouring melanoma cells and keratinocytes was interrelated, which is a further indication that Smad2 phosphorylation in primary melanoma is affected by local area microenvironmental factors. We hypothesize that the observed decrease in transforming growth factor beta signalling in thicker primary melanomas is due to the increased production of signalling inhibitors.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Surgical Pathology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:08 Apr 2009 09:18
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 21:33
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0960-8931
Publisher DOI:10.1097/CMR.0b013e3280dec693
PubMed ID:17496789
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 2
Google Scholar™
Scopus®. Citation Count: 2

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