Quick Search:

uzh logo
Browse by:
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Zurich Open Repository and Archive

Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-18107

Meli, M L; Cattori, V; Martínez, F; López, G; Vargas, A; Simón, M A; Zorrilla, I; Muñoz, A; Palomares, F; López-Bao, J V; Pastor, J; Tandon, R; Willi, B; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Lutz, H (2009). Feline leukemia virus and other pathogens as important threats to the survival of the critically endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus). PLoS ONE, 4(3):e4744.

[img]
Preview
PDF
1MB

View at publisher

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is considered the most endangered felid species in the world. In order to save this species, the Spanish authorities implemented a captive breeding program recruiting lynxes from the wild. In this context, a retrospective survey on prevalence of selected feline pathogens in free-ranging lynxes was initiated. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We systematically analyzed the prevalence and importance of seven viral, one protozoan (Cytauxzoon felis), and several bacterial (e.g., hemotropic mycoplasma) infections in 77 of approximately 200 remaining free-ranging Iberian lynxes of the Doñana and Sierra Morena areas, in Southern Spain, between 2003 and 2007. With the exception of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), evidence of infection by all tested feline pathogens was found in Iberian lynxes. Fourteen lynxes were feline leukemia virus (FeLV) provirus-positive; eleven of these were antigenemic (FeLV p27 positive). All 14 animals tested negative for other viral infections. During a six-month period in 2007, six of the provirus-positive antigenemic lynxes died. Infection with FeLV but not with other infectious agents was associated with mortality (p<0.001). Sequencing of the FeLV surface glycoprotein gene revealed a common origin for ten of the eleven samples. The ten sequences were closely related to FeLV-A/61E, originally isolated from cats in the USA. Endogenous FeLV sequences were not detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It was concluded that the FeLV infection most likely originated from domestic cats invading the lynx's habitats. Data available regarding the time frame, co-infections, and outcome of FeLV-infections suggest that, in contrast to the domestic cat, the FeLV strain affecting the lynxes in 2007 is highly virulent to this species. Our data argue strongly for vaccination of lynxes and domestic cats in and around lynx's habitats in order to prevent further spread of the virus as well as reduction the domestic cat population if the lynx population is to be maintained.

Citations

29 citations in Web of Science®
35 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

80 downloads since deposited on 13 Apr 2009
9 downloads since 12 months

Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals > Clinical Laboratory
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:13 Apr 2009 10:12
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 18:40
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1932-6203
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0004744
PubMed ID:19270739

Users (please log in): suggest update or correction for this item

Repository Staff Only: item control page