UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

3-Fluoro-2,4-dioxa-3-phosphadecalins as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase: a reappraisal of kinetic mechanisms and diagnostic methods


Baici, A; Schenker, P; Wächter, M; Rüedi, P (2009). 3-Fluoro-2,4-dioxa-3-phosphadecalins as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase: a reappraisal of kinetic mechanisms and diagnostic methods. Chemistry & Biodiversity, 6(3):261-282.

Abstract

A systematic survey of the acetylcholine-mimetic 2,4-dioxa-3-phosphadecalins as irreversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase revealed hitherto overlooked properties as far as the kinetic mechanisms of interaction are concerned. As a support to past and future work in this field, we describe the kinetics of eight reaction schemes that may be found in irreversible enzyme modification and compare them with two mechanism of reversible, slow-binding inhibition. The relevant kinetic equations and their associated graphical representations are given for all mechanisms, and concrete examples illustrate their practical use. Since irreversible inhibition is a time-dependent phenomenon, kinetic analysis is greatly facilitated by fitting the appropriate integrated rate equations to reaction-progress curves by nonlinear regression. This primary scrutiny provides kinetic parameters that are indispensable tools for diagnosing the kinetic mechanism and for calculating inhibition constants. Numerical integration of sets of differential equations is an additional useful investigation tool in critical situations, e.g., when inhibitors are unstable and/or act as irreversible modifiers only temporarily.

A systematic survey of the acetylcholine-mimetic 2,4-dioxa-3-phosphadecalins as irreversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase revealed hitherto overlooked properties as far as the kinetic mechanisms of interaction are concerned. As a support to past and future work in this field, we describe the kinetics of eight reaction schemes that may be found in irreversible enzyme modification and compare them with two mechanism of reversible, slow-binding inhibition. The relevant kinetic equations and their associated graphical representations are given for all mechanisms, and concrete examples illustrate their practical use. Since irreversible inhibition is a time-dependent phenomenon, kinetic analysis is greatly facilitated by fitting the appropriate integrated rate equations to reaction-progress curves by nonlinear regression. This primary scrutiny provides kinetic parameters that are indispensable tools for diagnosing the kinetic mechanism and for calculating inhibition constants. Numerical integration of sets of differential equations is an additional useful investigation tool in critical situations, e.g., when inhibitors are unstable and/or act as irreversible modifiers only temporarily.

Citations

18 citations in Web of Science®
20 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 16 Apr 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Biochemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Biochemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:March 2009
Deposited On:16 Apr 2009 10:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:12
Publisher:Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta
ISSN:1612-1872
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/cbdv.200800334
PubMed ID:19319863
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-18248

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations