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Prion diseases.


Aguzzi, A; Weissmann, C (1998). Prion diseases. Haemophilia, 4(4):619-627.

Abstract

Although the nature of the infectious agent causing prion diseases is still debated, several of its molecular characteristics have been clarified in remarkable detail. The transmissibility of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to humans dramatically highlights the need for research focused at interference with prion replication and spread, and at prevention of brain damage. Precondition to achieving these goals is a thorough understanding of prion biology, and in particular of its protein chemistry.

Although the nature of the infectious agent causing prion diseases is still debated, several of its molecular characteristics have been clarified in remarkable detail. The transmissibility of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to humans dramatically highlights the need for research focused at interference with prion replication and spread, and at prevention of brain damage. Precondition to achieving these goals is a thorough understanding of prion biology, and in particular of its protein chemistry.

Citations

21 citations in Web of Science®
20 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 July 1998
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:20
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1351-8216
Publisher DOI:10.1046/j.1365-2516.1998.440619.x
PubMed ID:9873804

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