UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Causation of injuries in female football players in top-level tournaments


Tscholl, P; O’Riordan, D; Fuller, C W; Dvorak, J; Gutzwiller, Felix; Junge, A (2008). Causation of injuries in female football players in top-level tournaments. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 41(Suppl ):i8-i14.

Abstract

Background: Analyses of tackle parameters in injury situations have provided valuable information regarding men’s football. However, there are no similar data for women’s football.

Objective: To categorise the tackle mechanisms leading to injury in elite women’s football.

Study design: Retrospective video analysis of injury situations.

Methods: Events associated with all reported injuries during six women’s top-level tournaments were analysed on video recordings for tackle parameters.

Results: More than half of all injuries were due to tackles from the side (52%, 103/200), whereas tackles from behind were much less commonly involved in injury situations (11%, 21/200). One-footed (65%, 130/200) and upper body (21%, 42/200) tackle actions were most common. Sliding-in tackles leading to injury were the least likely to be sanctioned by match referees. Tackling players (45%, 90/200) were almost as likely to be injured as the tackled player (55%).

Conclusion: The present study found differences between injury mechanisms in women’s football and previously published data on men’s football. Further research, especially using video analysis, is needed for a better understanding of risk situations in football.

Background: Analyses of tackle parameters in injury situations have provided valuable information regarding men’s football. However, there are no similar data for women’s football.

Objective: To categorise the tackle mechanisms leading to injury in elite women’s football.

Study design: Retrospective video analysis of injury situations.

Methods: Events associated with all reported injuries during six women’s top-level tournaments were analysed on video recordings for tackle parameters.

Results: More than half of all injuries were due to tackles from the side (52%, 103/200), whereas tackles from behind were much less commonly involved in injury situations (11%, 21/200). One-footed (65%, 130/200) and upper body (21%, 42/200) tackle actions were most common. Sliding-in tackles leading to injury were the least likely to be sanctioned by match referees. Tackling players (45%, 90/200) were almost as likely to be injured as the tackled player (55%).

Conclusion: The present study found differences between injury mechanisms in women’s football and previously published data on men’s football. Further research, especially using video analysis, is needed for a better understanding of risk situations in football.

Citations

7 citations in Web of Science®
15 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 19 Apr 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:19 Apr 2009 10:05
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:12
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0306-3674
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2007.036871
PubMed ID:17646251
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-18294

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations