UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Epidemiology of aphasia attributable to first ischemic stroke: incidence, severity, fluency, etiology, and thrombolysis


Engelter, S T; Gostynski, Michal; Papa, S; Frei, M; Born, C; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Gutzwiller, Felix; Lyrer, P A (2006). Epidemiology of aphasia attributable to first ischemic stroke: incidence, severity, fluency, etiology, and thrombolysis. Stroke, 37(6):1379-1384.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In a geographically defined population, we assessed incidence and determinants of aphasia attributable to first-ever ischemic stroke (FEIS).

METHODS: A 1-year prospective, population-based study among the permanent residents of the canton Basle City, Switzerland, was performed using multiple overlapping sources of information.

RESULTS: Among 188,015 inhabitants, 269 patients had FEIS, of whom 80 (30%; 95% CI, 24 to 36) had aphasia. The overall incidence rate of aphasia attributable to FEIS amounted to 43 per 100,000 inhabitants (95% CI, 33 to 52). Aphasic stroke patients were older than nonaphasic patients. The risk of aphasia attributable to FEIS increased by 4% (95% CI, 1% to 7%), and after controlling for atrial fibrillation, by 3% (95% CI, 1% to 7%) with each year of patients' age. Gender had no effect on incidence, severity, or fluency of aphasia. Cardioembolism was more frequent in aphasic stroke patients than in nonaphasic ones (odds ratio [OR], 1.85; 95% CI, 1.07 to 3.20). Aphasic patients sought medical help earlier than nonaphasic stroke patients. Still, after controlling for stroke onset-assessment interval, aphasic stroke patients were more likely to receive thrombolysis than nonaphasics (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.12 to 10.96).

CONCLUSIONS: Annually, 43 of 100,000 inhabitants had aphasia resulting from first ischemic stroke. Advancing age and cardioembolism were associated with an increased risk for aphasia. Severity and fluency of aphasia were not affected by demographic variables.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In a geographically defined population, we assessed incidence and determinants of aphasia attributable to first-ever ischemic stroke (FEIS).

METHODS: A 1-year prospective, population-based study among the permanent residents of the canton Basle City, Switzerland, was performed using multiple overlapping sources of information.

RESULTS: Among 188,015 inhabitants, 269 patients had FEIS, of whom 80 (30%; 95% CI, 24 to 36) had aphasia. The overall incidence rate of aphasia attributable to FEIS amounted to 43 per 100,000 inhabitants (95% CI, 33 to 52). Aphasic stroke patients were older than nonaphasic patients. The risk of aphasia attributable to FEIS increased by 4% (95% CI, 1% to 7%), and after controlling for atrial fibrillation, by 3% (95% CI, 1% to 7%) with each year of patients' age. Gender had no effect on incidence, severity, or fluency of aphasia. Cardioembolism was more frequent in aphasic stroke patients than in nonaphasic ones (odds ratio [OR], 1.85; 95% CI, 1.07 to 3.20). Aphasic patients sought medical help earlier than nonaphasic stroke patients. Still, after controlling for stroke onset-assessment interval, aphasic stroke patients were more likely to receive thrombolysis than nonaphasics (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.12 to 10.96).

CONCLUSIONS: Annually, 43 of 100,000 inhabitants had aphasia resulting from first ischemic stroke. Advancing age and cardioembolism were associated with an increased risk for aphasia. Severity and fluency of aphasia were not affected by demographic variables.

Citations

141 citations in Web of Science®
161 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 24 Apr 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2006
Deposited On:24 Apr 2009 13:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:13
Publisher:American Heart Association
ISSN:0039-2499
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1161/01.STR.0000221815.64093.8c
PubMed ID:16690899

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations