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Towards an automated detection of avalanche deposits using their directional properties


Bühler, Y; Hüni, A; Kellenberger, T W; Itten, K I (2009). Towards an automated detection of avalanche deposits using their directional properties. In: 6th EARSeL SIG IS workshop on: "Imaging Spectroscopy: innovative tool for scientific and commercial environmental applications", Tel Aviv, Israel, 16 March 2009 - 19 March 2009.

Abstract

Snow avalanches killed more people in the Swiss alpine area during the past decades than any other natural hazard. To further improve the avalanche prediction and the protection of people and infrastructure, information about the occurrence and the distribution of avalanche activity is crucial.
Nevertheless this information is missing for large parts of the Alpine area. The surface roughness of avalanche deposits differs considerably from the adjacent undisturbed snow cover and is an important factor of the directional reflectance anisotropy. The undisturbed snow-cover exhibits a strong forward scattering, while the structure of an avalanche deposit causes shadow casting and tilt
effects. Therefore, the observed reflectance of avalanche deposits and undisturbed snow cover is strongly dependent on the illumination- and viewing angles. This study demonstrates the potential of multiangular remote sensing data for detecting and mapping avalanche deposits. The results indicate, that air- or spaceborne multiangular sensors are suitable for rapid detection and mapping of avalanches in inaccessible and remote regions.

Snow avalanches killed more people in the Swiss alpine area during the past decades than any other natural hazard. To further improve the avalanche prediction and the protection of people and infrastructure, information about the occurrence and the distribution of avalanche activity is crucial.
Nevertheless this information is missing for large parts of the Alpine area. The surface roughness of avalanche deposits differs considerably from the adjacent undisturbed snow cover and is an important factor of the directional reflectance anisotropy. The undisturbed snow-cover exhibits a strong forward scattering, while the structure of an avalanche deposit causes shadow casting and tilt
effects. Therefore, the observed reflectance of avalanche deposits and undisturbed snow cover is strongly dependent on the illumination- and viewing angles. This study demonstrates the potential of multiangular remote sensing data for detecting and mapping avalanche deposits. The results indicate, that air- or spaceborne multiangular sensors are suitable for rapid detection and mapping of avalanches in inaccessible and remote regions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Event End Date:19 March 2009
Deposited On:06 May 2009 13:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:13
Publisher:European Association of Remote Sensing Laboratories
Additional Information:The paper will be published in Proceedings of the 6th EARSeL SIG IS workshop.
Official URL:http://www.earsel6th.tau.ac.il/Programme.html
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-18485

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