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Wear resistance and surface roughness of a newly devised adhesive patch for sealing smooth enamel surfaces


Schmidlin, Patrick R; Göhring, T N; Roos, Malgorzata; Zehnder, Matthias (2006). Wear resistance and surface roughness of a newly devised adhesive patch for sealing smooth enamel surfaces. Operative Dentistry, 31(1):115-121.

Abstract

A laboratory study assessed the wear resistance and surface roughness after chemical and mechanical wear of a newly devised adhesive patch when used as a smooth surface sealant. Forty-eight enamel discs were prepared from bovine lower central incisors. Sixteen specimens were treated with one of two sealing options: the prototype of an adhesive patch or a flowable resin. Unsealed enamel served as the positive control. Wear and surface roughness was measured at baseline and after all the samples were immersed in saliva or lactic acid (n=8 per treatment group) for up to 21 days, during which the experimental and control enamel surfaces were exposed to 10 double-stroke toothbrush cycles per day. In saliva and lactic acid, the sealed specimens showed no significant wear during the observation period (p=0.1841). Only untreated specimens exposed to lactic acid showed a significant substance loss after 14 and 21 days (p=0.0186). The patch and flowable resin showed no differences in surface roughness values at respective times (p=0.385); whereas the surface roughness of the unsealed specimens in lactic acid was significantly higher (p<0.0001). It was concluded that the adhesive patch under investigation merits further study to assess its potential as a sealant for smooth enamel surfaces.

Abstract

A laboratory study assessed the wear resistance and surface roughness after chemical and mechanical wear of a newly devised adhesive patch when used as a smooth surface sealant. Forty-eight enamel discs were prepared from bovine lower central incisors. Sixteen specimens were treated with one of two sealing options: the prototype of an adhesive patch or a flowable resin. Unsealed enamel served as the positive control. Wear and surface roughness was measured at baseline and after all the samples were immersed in saliva or lactic acid (n=8 per treatment group) for up to 21 days, during which the experimental and control enamel surfaces were exposed to 10 double-stroke toothbrush cycles per day. In saliva and lactic acid, the sealed specimens showed no significant wear during the observation period (p=0.1841). Only untreated specimens exposed to lactic acid showed a significant substance loss after 14 and 21 days (p=0.0186). The patch and flowable resin showed no differences in surface roughness values at respective times (p=0.385); whereas the surface roughness of the unsealed specimens in lactic acid was significantly higher (p<0.0001). It was concluded that the adhesive patch under investigation merits further study to assess its potential as a sealant for smooth enamel surfaces.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:13 May 2009 16:07
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:13
Publisher:Academy of Operative Dentistry
ISSN:0361-7734
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2341/04-202
Related URLs:http://www.jopdentonline.org (Publisher)
PubMed ID:16536202

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