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New hippocampal neurons are not obligatory for memory formation; cyclin D2 knockout mice with no adult brain neurogenesis show learning


Jaholkowski, P; Kiryk, A; Jedynak, P; Ben Abdallah, N M; Knapska, E; Kowalczyk, A; Piechal, A; Blecharz-Klin, K; Figiel, I; Lioudyno, V; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, E; Wilczynski, G M; Lipp, H P; Kaczmarek, L; Filipkowski, R (2009). New hippocampal neurons are not obligatory for memory formation; cyclin D2 knockout mice with no adult brain neurogenesis show learning. Learning and Memory, 16(7):439-451.

Abstract

The role of adult brain neurogenesis (generating new neurons) in learning and memory appears to be quite firmly established in spite of some criticism and lack of understanding of what the new neurons serve the brain for. Also, the few experiments showing that blocking adult neurogenesis causes learning deficits used irradiation and various drugs known for their side effects and the results obtained vary greatly. We used a novel approach, cyclin D2 knockout mice (D2 KO mice), specifically lacking adult brain neurogenesis to verify its importance in learning and memory. D2 KO mice and their wild-type siblings were tested in several behavioral paradigms, including those in which the role of adult neurogenesis has been postulated. D2 KO mice showed no impairment in sensorimotor tests, with only sensory impairment in an olfaction-dependent task. However, D2 KO mice showed proper procedural learning as well as learning in context (including remote memory), cue, and trace fear conditioning, Morris water maze, novel object recognition test, and in a multifunctional behavioral system-IntelliCages. D2 KO mice also demonstrated correct reversal learning. Our results suggest that adult brain neurogenesis is not obligatory in learning, including the kinds of learning where the role of adult neurogenesis has previously been strongly suggested.

The role of adult brain neurogenesis (generating new neurons) in learning and memory appears to be quite firmly established in spite of some criticism and lack of understanding of what the new neurons serve the brain for. Also, the few experiments showing that blocking adult neurogenesis causes learning deficits used irradiation and various drugs known for their side effects and the results obtained vary greatly. We used a novel approach, cyclin D2 knockout mice (D2 KO mice), specifically lacking adult brain neurogenesis to verify its importance in learning and memory. D2 KO mice and their wild-type siblings were tested in several behavioral paradigms, including those in which the role of adult neurogenesis has been postulated. D2 KO mice showed no impairment in sensorimotor tests, with only sensory impairment in an olfaction-dependent task. However, D2 KO mice showed proper procedural learning as well as learning in context (including remote memory), cue, and trace fear conditioning, Morris water maze, novel object recognition test, and in a multifunctional behavioral system-IntelliCages. D2 KO mice also demonstrated correct reversal learning. Our results suggest that adult brain neurogenesis is not obligatory in learning, including the kinds of learning where the role of adult neurogenesis has previously been strongly suggested.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2009
Deposited On:13 Jul 2009 15:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:13
Publisher:Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
ISSN:1072-0502
Publisher DOI:10.1101/lm.1459709
Official URL:http://learnmem.cshlp.org/
PubMed ID:19553382
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-18566

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