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Initially Asymptomatic Meniscal Lesions of the Knee Were Later Associated with Complaints of Pain, Stiffness, and Impaired Function but Severity Was Low


Zanetti, M; Pfirrmann, C W; Schmid, M R; Romero, J; Seifert, Burkhardt; Hodler, J (2006). Initially Asymptomatic Meniscal Lesions of the Knee Were Later Associated with Complaints of Pain, Stiffness, and Impaired Function but Severity Was Low. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume, 88(10):2312.

Abstract

Question: In asymptomatic patients, what is the clinical course of meniscal lesions diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging?

Design: Inception cohort study with follow-up of ≥2 years (mean, 30 mo).

Setting: An orthopaedic hospital in Zurich, Switzerland.

Patients: 100 patients who were referred for magnetic resonance imaging for suspected meniscal lesions in one knee and no symptoms in the other were followed. Patients were ≥18 years of age, had no pain in the asymptomatic knee before presenting for magnetic resonance imaging, had not experienced disruptions of work or sports activity because of knee problems, and had not had knee surgery. 84 patients (mean age, 44 y; 57% men) completed the study.

Assessment of prognostic factors: Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess meniscal lesions of the asymptomatic knee. 53 knees had normal menisci, 26 had horizontal or oblique partial-thickness tears, 1 had a radial tear, 2 had vertical or full-thickness tears, and 2 had tears with displaced meniscal fragments.

Main outcome measure: The adapted Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), which assessed pain, stiffness, and function with use of visual analogue scales (VAS).

Main results: More patients with meniscal tears than those without meniscal tears reported having some pain, stiffness, and impaired daily function; however, the mean VAS scores for these outcomes did not differ between patients with and without meniscal tears (Table). None of the initially asymptomatic knees underwent surgery during follow-up.

Abstract

Question: In asymptomatic patients, what is the clinical course of meniscal lesions diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging?

Design: Inception cohort study with follow-up of ≥2 years (mean, 30 mo).

Setting: An orthopaedic hospital in Zurich, Switzerland.

Patients: 100 patients who were referred for magnetic resonance imaging for suspected meniscal lesions in one knee and no symptoms in the other were followed. Patients were ≥18 years of age, had no pain in the asymptomatic knee before presenting for magnetic resonance imaging, had not experienced disruptions of work or sports activity because of knee problems, and had not had knee surgery. 84 patients (mean age, 44 y; 57% men) completed the study.

Assessment of prognostic factors: Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess meniscal lesions of the asymptomatic knee. 53 knees had normal menisci, 26 had horizontal or oblique partial-thickness tears, 1 had a radial tear, 2 had vertical or full-thickness tears, and 2 had tears with displaced meniscal fragments.

Main outcome measure: The adapted Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), which assessed pain, stiffness, and function with use of visual analogue scales (VAS).

Main results: More patients with meniscal tears than those without meniscal tears reported having some pain, stiffness, and impaired daily function; however, the mean VAS scores for these outcomes did not differ between patients with and without meniscal tears (Table). None of the initially asymptomatic knees underwent surgery during follow-up.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:October 2006
Deposited On:20 May 2009 05:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:13
Publisher:Boston, Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery
ISSN:0021-9355
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.8811.ebo2

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