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Measurement of compartment pressure of the rectus sheath during intra-abdominal hypertension in rats


Meier, C; Schramm, R; Holstein, J H; Seifert, Burkhardt; Trentz, O; Menger, M D (2006). Measurement of compartment pressure of the rectus sheath during intra-abdominal hypertension in rats. Intensive Care Medicine, 32(10):1644-1648.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the compartment pressure of the rectus sheath (CPRS) reflects the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) under various conditions of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH). DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective experimental study with in vivo pressure measurements at the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Surgery, University of Saarland. ANIMALS: Sprague-Dawley rats. INTERVENTIONS: Stepwise increase and decrease in IAP with continuous measurement of the correspondent CPRS. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Physiological IAP (2 mmHg) and CPRS (6 mmHg) showed a statistically significant difference. Stepwise elevation in IAP was associated with a simultaneous increase in CPRS. Accordingly, stepwise decompression of IAP resulted in a stepwise decrease in CPRS. Under both conditions Bland-Altman analysis comparing IAP to correspondent CPRS showed a very good agreement for IAP at or above 12 mmHg. In addition, closure of the overlaying subcutaneous tissue and skin did not affect CPRS or its correlation with IAP. CONCLUSIONS: CPRS accurately reflects IAP for IAP of 12 mmHg or higher. Thus CPRS measurements may represent a novel approach for diagnosis and monitoring of IAH.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the compartment pressure of the rectus sheath (CPRS) reflects the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) under various conditions of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH). DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective experimental study with in vivo pressure measurements at the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Surgery, University of Saarland. ANIMALS: Sprague-Dawley rats. INTERVENTIONS: Stepwise increase and decrease in IAP with continuous measurement of the correspondent CPRS. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Physiological IAP (2 mmHg) and CPRS (6 mmHg) showed a statistically significant difference. Stepwise elevation in IAP was associated with a simultaneous increase in CPRS. Accordingly, stepwise decompression of IAP resulted in a stepwise decrease in CPRS. Under both conditions Bland-Altman analysis comparing IAP to correspondent CPRS showed a very good agreement for IAP at or above 12 mmHg. In addition, closure of the overlaying subcutaneous tissue and skin did not affect CPRS or its correlation with IAP. CONCLUSIONS: CPRS accurately reflects IAP for IAP of 12 mmHg or higher. Thus CPRS measurements may represent a novel approach for diagnosis and monitoring of IAH.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:29 August 2006
Deposited On:20 May 2009 07:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:13
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0342-4642
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00134-006-0366-4
PubMed ID:16941164
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-18591

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