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Segregated neural representation of psychological and somatic-vegetative symptoms in severe major depression


Heinzel, A; Grimm, S; Beck, J; Schuepbach, D; Hell, D; Boesiger, P; Boeker, H; Northoff, G (2009). Segregated neural representation of psychological and somatic-vegetative symptoms in severe major depression. Neuroscience Letters, 456(2):49-53.

Abstract

Objective: The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is probably the most widely used depression scale. It has been suggested that it contains a two-factor structure measuring cognitive-affective (i.e. psychological) and somatic-vegetative depressive symptoms. In this study we aim to evaluate these factors by probing for their neural correlates. Methods: Neural responses evoked by emotional perception, relative to an emotional judgment task, were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 20 medication-free patients with severe MDD. Psychological and somatic-vegetative symptoms were evaluated with the BDI. Results: Psychological symptoms correlated with signal changes in the dorsomedial and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, while somatic-vegetative symptoms correlated with signal changes in the pre-genual anterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions: These preliminary findings demonstrate segregated neural representation of psychological and somatic-vegetative symptoms of MDD in different cortical regions. Thus, our results indicate that the two-factor structure of the BDI is related to distinct neural correlates.

Objective: The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is probably the most widely used depression scale. It has been suggested that it contains a two-factor structure measuring cognitive-affective (i.e. psychological) and somatic-vegetative depressive symptoms. In this study we aim to evaluate these factors by probing for their neural correlates. Methods: Neural responses evoked by emotional perception, relative to an emotional judgment task, were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 20 medication-free patients with severe MDD. Psychological and somatic-vegetative symptoms were evaluated with the BDI. Results: Psychological symptoms correlated with signal changes in the dorsomedial and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, while somatic-vegetative symptoms correlated with signal changes in the pre-genual anterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions: These preliminary findings demonstrate segregated neural representation of psychological and somatic-vegetative symptoms of MDD in different cortical regions. Thus, our results indicate that the two-factor structure of the BDI is related to distinct neural correlates.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:5 June 2009
Deposited On:25 May 2009 08:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:13
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0304-3940
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.neulet.2009.03.097
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-18642

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