UZH-Logo

The heavy metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) is not required for neural differentiation.


Lichtlen, P; Georgiev, O; Schaffner, W; Aguzzi, A; Brandner, S (1999). The heavy metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) is not required for neural differentiation. Biological Chemistry, 380(6):711-715.

Abstract

The zinc finger transcription factor MTF-1 is essential for proper response to heavy metal load and other stress conditions in vertebrates, and also contributes to the maintenance of the cellular redox state. Target genes include metallothioneins (MT-I and MT-II) and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS), an enzyme involved in glutathione biosynthesis. Although MTF-1 is expressed ubiquitously, the primary defect in null mutant mice is hepatocyte necrosis, which results in embryonic lethality around day E14 and prevents the analysis of delayed effects on other organs. To assess the impact of MTF-1 deficiency on the function of the mature central nervous system, we employed the neural grafting strategy. Neuroectodermal brain tissue obtained from transgenic mouse embryos at gestational day 12.5 was transplanted into the caudoputamen of adult wild-type mice. 33 days later, grafts derived from MTF-1 deficient mice consisted of fully differentiated neuroectodermal tissue and showed no differences to heterozygous control grafts. This indicates that MTF-1 is dispensable for the development and differentiation of the nervous system. Such transplants devoid of MTF-1 may provide a useful tool for the further investigation of the effect of cell stress, including oxidative stress.

The zinc finger transcription factor MTF-1 is essential for proper response to heavy metal load and other stress conditions in vertebrates, and also contributes to the maintenance of the cellular redox state. Target genes include metallothioneins (MT-I and MT-II) and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS), an enzyme involved in glutathione biosynthesis. Although MTF-1 is expressed ubiquitously, the primary defect in null mutant mice is hepatocyte necrosis, which results in embryonic lethality around day E14 and prevents the analysis of delayed effects on other organs. To assess the impact of MTF-1 deficiency on the function of the mature central nervous system, we employed the neural grafting strategy. Neuroectodermal brain tissue obtained from transgenic mouse embryos at gestational day 12.5 was transplanted into the caudoputamen of adult wild-type mice. 33 days later, grafts derived from MTF-1 deficient mice consisted of fully differentiated neuroectodermal tissue and showed no differences to heterozygous control grafts. This indicates that MTF-1 is dispensable for the development and differentiation of the nervous system. Such transplants devoid of MTF-1 may provide a useful tool for the further investigation of the effect of cell stress, including oxidative stress.

Citations

13 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

111 downloads since deposited on 11 Feb 2008
21 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 June 1999
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:20
Publisher:De Gruyter
ISSN:1431-6730
Publisher DOI:10.1515/BC.1999.089
PubMed ID:10430037
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-1868

Download

[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 371kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations