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Head roll dependent variability of subjective visual vertical and ocular counterroll


Tarnutzer, A A; Bockisch, C J; Straumann, D (2009). Head roll dependent variability of subjective visual vertical and ocular counterroll. Experimental Brain Research, 195(4):621-626.

Abstract

We compared the variability of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) and static ocular counterroll (OCR), and hypothesized a correlation between the measurements because of their shared macular input. SVV and OCR were measured simultaneously in various whole-body roll positions [upright, 45 degrees right-ear down (RED), and 75 degrees RED] in six subjects. Gains of OCR were -0.18 (45 degrees RED) and -0.12 (75 degrees RED), whereas gains of compensation for body roll in the SVV task were -1.11 (45 degrees RED) and -0.96 (75 degrees RED). Normalized SVV and OCR variabilities were not significantly different (P > 0.05), i.e., both increased with increasing roll. Moreover, a significant correlation (R (2) = 0.80, slope = 0.29) between SVV and OCR variabilities was found. Whereas the gain of OCR is different from the gain of SVV, trial-to-trial variability of OCR follows the same roll-dependent modulation observed in SVV variability. We propose that the similarities in variability reflect a common otolith input, which, however, is subject to distinct central processing for determining the gain of SVV and OCR.

We compared the variability of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) and static ocular counterroll (OCR), and hypothesized a correlation between the measurements because of their shared macular input. SVV and OCR were measured simultaneously in various whole-body roll positions [upright, 45 degrees right-ear down (RED), and 75 degrees RED] in six subjects. Gains of OCR were -0.18 (45 degrees RED) and -0.12 (75 degrees RED), whereas gains of compensation for body roll in the SVV task were -1.11 (45 degrees RED) and -0.96 (75 degrees RED). Normalized SVV and OCR variabilities were not significantly different (P > 0.05), i.e., both increased with increasing roll. Moreover, a significant correlation (R (2) = 0.80, slope = 0.29) between SVV and OCR variabilities was found. Whereas the gain of OCR is different from the gain of SVV, trial-to-trial variability of OCR follows the same roll-dependent modulation observed in SVV variability. We propose that the similarities in variability reflect a common otolith input, which, however, is subject to distinct central processing for determining the gain of SVV and OCR.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Ophthalmology Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2009
Deposited On:15 Jun 2009 08:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:14
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0014-4819
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00221-009-1823-4
PubMed ID:19415246
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-18716

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