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Gingivitis as a risk factor in periodontal disease


Lang, N P; Schätzle, M A; Löe, H (2009). Gingivitis as a risk factor in periodontal disease. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 36 (Suppl.):3-8.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Dental plaque has been proven to initiate and promote gingival inflammation. Histologically, various stages of gingivitis may be characterized prior to progression of a lesion to periodontitis. Clinically, gingivitis is well recognized. MATERIAL & METHODS: Longitudinal studies on a patient cohort of 565 middle class Norwegian males have been performed over a 26-year period to reveal the natural history of initial periodontitis in dental-minded subjects between 16 and 34 years of age at the beginning of the study. RESULTS: Sites with consistent bleeding (GI=2) had 70% more attachment loss than sites that were consistently non-inflamed (GI=0). Teeth with sites that were consistently non-inflamed had a 50-year survival rate of 99.5%, while teeth with consistently inflamed gingivae yielded a 50-year survival rate of 63.4%. CONCLUSION: Based on this longitudinal study on the natural history of periodontitis in a dentally well-maintained male population it can be concluded that persistent gingivitis represents a risk factor for periodontal attachment loss and for tooth loss.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Dental plaque has been proven to initiate and promote gingival inflammation. Histologically, various stages of gingivitis may be characterized prior to progression of a lesion to periodontitis. Clinically, gingivitis is well recognized. MATERIAL & METHODS: Longitudinal studies on a patient cohort of 565 middle class Norwegian males have been performed over a 26-year period to reveal the natural history of initial periodontitis in dental-minded subjects between 16 and 34 years of age at the beginning of the study. RESULTS: Sites with consistent bleeding (GI=2) had 70% more attachment loss than sites that were consistently non-inflamed (GI=0). Teeth with sites that were consistently non-inflamed had a 50-year survival rate of 99.5%, while teeth with consistently inflamed gingivae yielded a 50-year survival rate of 63.4%. CONCLUSION: Based on this longitudinal study on the natural history of periodontitis in a dentally well-maintained male population it can be concluded that persistent gingivitis represents a risk factor for periodontal attachment loss and for tooth loss.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2009
Deposited On:18 May 2009 12:11
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:14
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0303-6979
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-051X.2009.01415.x
Official URL:http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/122380914/PDFSTART
PubMed ID:19432625

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