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Tissue-specific expression of a FMR1/beta-galactosidase fusion gene in transgenic mice.


Hergersberg, M; Matsuo, K; Gassmann, M; Schaffner, W; Lüscher, B; Rülicke, T; Aguzzi, A (1995). Tissue-specific expression of a FMR1/beta-galactosidase fusion gene in transgenic mice. Human Molecular Genetics, 4(3):359-366.

Abstract

Fragile X syndrome is one of the most common genetic causes of mental retardation, yet the mechanisms controlling expression of the fragile X mental retardation gene FMR1 are poorly understood. To identify sequences regulating FMR1 transcription, transgenic mouse lines were established using a fusion gene consisting of an E.coli beta-galactosidase reporter gene (lacZ) linked to a 2.8 kb fragment spanning the 5'-region of FMR1. Five transgenic mouse lines showed lacZ expression in brain, in particular in neurons of the hippocampus and the granular layer of the cerebellum. Expression of the reporter gene was also detected in Leydig cells and spermatogonia in the testis, in many epithelia of adult mice, and in the two other steroidogenic cell types, adrenal cortex cells and ovarian follicle cells. Embryonic tissues which showed strong activity of the reporter gene included the telencephalon, the genital ridge, and the notochord. This expression pattern closely resembles the endogenous one, indicating that the 5' FMR1 gene promoter region used in this study contains most cis-acting elements regulating FMR1 transcription.

Fragile X syndrome is one of the most common genetic causes of mental retardation, yet the mechanisms controlling expression of the fragile X mental retardation gene FMR1 are poorly understood. To identify sequences regulating FMR1 transcription, transgenic mouse lines were established using a fusion gene consisting of an E.coli beta-galactosidase reporter gene (lacZ) linked to a 2.8 kb fragment spanning the 5'-region of FMR1. Five transgenic mouse lines showed lacZ expression in brain, in particular in neurons of the hippocampus and the granular layer of the cerebellum. Expression of the reporter gene was also detected in Leydig cells and spermatogonia in the testis, in many epithelia of adult mice, and in the two other steroidogenic cell types, adrenal cortex cells and ovarian follicle cells. Embryonic tissues which showed strong activity of the reporter gene included the telencephalon, the genital ridge, and the notochord. This expression pattern closely resembles the endogenous one, indicating that the 5' FMR1 gene promoter region used in this study contains most cis-acting elements regulating FMR1 transcription.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 March 1995
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:20
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0964-6906
Publisher DOI:10.1093/hmg/4.3.359
Related URLs:http://hmg.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/4/3/359
PubMed ID:7795588
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-1875

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