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Hydrogen sulfide: a new gaseous signal molecule and blood pressure regulator


Wagner, C A (2009). Hydrogen sulfide: a new gaseous signal molecule and blood pressure regulator. Journal of Nephrology, 22(2):173-176.

Abstract

The gas hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is emerging as a novel regulator of important physiologic functions such as arterial diameter, blood flow and leukocyte adhesion. In addition, it may have antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic effects. H2S has recently attracted much interest as a potent vasorelaxative substance that may establish itself alongside another gaseous signal molecule, nitric oxide (NO). In contrast to NO, the major source of H2S in blood may be production by red blood cells or by vascular smooth muscle cells. H2S is produced from cysteine, involving the enzymes cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE). The importance of CSE was recently demonstrated in a mouse lacking CSE which showed reduced H2S levels and developed hypertension and reduced endothelium-mediated vasorelaxation. These data establish H2S as a new and important biologic signal molecule and as a new regulator of vascular blood flow and blood pressure.

The gas hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is emerging as a novel regulator of important physiologic functions such as arterial diameter, blood flow and leukocyte adhesion. In addition, it may have antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic effects. H2S has recently attracted much interest as a potent vasorelaxative substance that may establish itself alongside another gaseous signal molecule, nitric oxide (NO). In contrast to NO, the major source of H2S in blood may be production by red blood cells or by vascular smooth muscle cells. H2S is produced from cysteine, involving the enzymes cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE). The importance of CSE was recently demonstrated in a mouse lacking CSE which showed reduced H2S levels and developed hypertension and reduced endothelium-mediated vasorelaxation. These data establish H2S as a new and important biologic signal molecule and as a new regulator of vascular blood flow and blood pressure.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:09 Jun 2009 11:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:14
Publisher:Wichtig Editore
ISSN:1121-8428
Official URL:http://www.jnephrol.com/public/JN/Article/Article.aspx?UidArticle=E045B564-B474-4DA3-B443-E1C74A427EDE
PubMed ID:19384833
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-18872

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