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Prion pathogenesis in the absence of Toll-like receptor signalling.


Prinz, M; Heikenwalder, M; Schwarz, Petra; Takeda, K; Akira, S; Aguzzi, A (2003). Prion pathogenesis in the absence of Toll-like receptor signalling. EMBO Reports, 4(2):195-199.

Abstract

To reach the brain from peripheral sites, prions must colonize various cell types within the lymphoreticular compartment. However, no prion entry receptors are yet known. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors that bind a multitude of pathogens and are therefore candidates as effectors of prion entry. Moreover, injection of unmethylated CpG oligodinucleotides, which stimulate TLR9, has been reported to delay peripherally initiated scrapie. We therefore studied prion infection in MyD88(-/-) mice, which are defective in TLR signalling. Despite subtle defects in splenic microarchitecture, MyD88(-/-) mice challenged intraperitoneally or intracerebrally were fully susceptible to disease and died of scrapie after similar incubation times to those of wild-type mice. Splenic infectivity titres rose to similar levels with the same kinetics, and brains showed similar histopathological changes. TLR signalling therefore does not have any major role in prion pathogenesis, and the protective effect of TLR stimulation is unlikely to result from direct interactions with prions.

To reach the brain from peripheral sites, prions must colonize various cell types within the lymphoreticular compartment. However, no prion entry receptors are yet known. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors that bind a multitude of pathogens and are therefore candidates as effectors of prion entry. Moreover, injection of unmethylated CpG oligodinucleotides, which stimulate TLR9, has been reported to delay peripherally initiated scrapie. We therefore studied prion infection in MyD88(-/-) mice, which are defective in TLR signalling. Despite subtle defects in splenic microarchitecture, MyD88(-/-) mice challenged intraperitoneally or intracerebrally were fully susceptible to disease and died of scrapie after similar incubation times to those of wild-type mice. Splenic infectivity titres rose to similar levels with the same kinetics, and brains showed similar histopathological changes. TLR signalling therefore does not have any major role in prion pathogenesis, and the protective effect of TLR stimulation is unlikely to result from direct interactions with prions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 February 2003
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:20
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1469-221X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.embor.embor731
PubMed ID:12612611
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-1892

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