UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Clinical course of knees with asymptomatic meniscal abnormalities: findings at 2-year follow-up after MR imaging-based diagnosis


Zanetti, M; Pfirrmann, C W A; Schmid, M R; Romero, J; Seifert, Burkhardt; Hodler, J (2005). Clinical course of knees with asymptomatic meniscal abnormalities: findings at 2-year follow-up after MR imaging-based diagnosis. Radiology, 237(3):993-997.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate the clinical course of asymptomatic meniscal lesions diagnosed by using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. The clinical courses of meniscal lesions in 84 asymptomatic knees (in 48 men and 36 women; mean age, 43.6 years; age range, 18-73 years) were assessed. Thirty-one asymptomatic meniscal lesions were depicted among the 84 knees at MR imaging. The follow-up period was at least 2 years (mean, 29.8 months; range, 24-36 months). Knee pain, stiffness, and function during daily and sports activities were assessed by using a visual analogue scale (VAS), on which a score of 0 indicated no pain or complaints and a score of 100 indicated maximal pain and/or complaints. The chi2 test was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: At follow-up, 12 (39%) of the 31 patients with and 10 (19%) of the 53 patients without meniscal lesions reported having knee pain (P = .046). Nine (29%) patients with and five (9%) patients without meniscal lesions reported having knee stiffness (P = .02). Ten (32%) patients with and five (9%) patients without meniscal lesions reported having impaired function during daily activities (P = .008). Thirteen (42%) patients with and 15 (28%) patients without meniscal lesions reported having impaired function during sports activities (P = .20). Mean VAS scores ranged from 22 to 30; mean VAS scores for pain, stiffness, impaired daily function, and impaired sports function were 26, 22, 27, and 30, respectively. None of the initially asymptomatic knees was treated with surgery during the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: The clinical course of knees with initially asymptomatic meniscal lesions, compared with the clinical course of knees without meniscal lesions, is characterized by an increased frequency of complaints. However, severities of pain and knee function impairment remain low.

PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate the clinical course of asymptomatic meniscal lesions diagnosed by using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. The clinical courses of meniscal lesions in 84 asymptomatic knees (in 48 men and 36 women; mean age, 43.6 years; age range, 18-73 years) were assessed. Thirty-one asymptomatic meniscal lesions were depicted among the 84 knees at MR imaging. The follow-up period was at least 2 years (mean, 29.8 months; range, 24-36 months). Knee pain, stiffness, and function during daily and sports activities were assessed by using a visual analogue scale (VAS), on which a score of 0 indicated no pain or complaints and a score of 100 indicated maximal pain and/or complaints. The chi2 test was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: At follow-up, 12 (39%) of the 31 patients with and 10 (19%) of the 53 patients without meniscal lesions reported having knee pain (P = .046). Nine (29%) patients with and five (9%) patients without meniscal lesions reported having knee stiffness (P = .02). Ten (32%) patients with and five (9%) patients without meniscal lesions reported having impaired function during daily activities (P = .008). Thirteen (42%) patients with and 15 (28%) patients without meniscal lesions reported having impaired function during sports activities (P = .20). Mean VAS scores ranged from 22 to 30; mean VAS scores for pain, stiffness, impaired daily function, and impaired sports function were 26, 22, 27, and 30, respectively. None of the initially asymptomatic knees was treated with surgery during the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: The clinical course of knees with initially asymptomatic meniscal lesions, compared with the clinical course of knees without meniscal lesions, is characterized by an increased frequency of complaints. However, severities of pain and knee function impairment remain low.

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

40 downloads since deposited on 08 Jun 2009
13 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2005
Deposited On:08 Jun 2009 15:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:15
Publisher:Radiological Society of North America
ISSN:0033-8419
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2373041465
PubMed ID:16251395
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-18960

Download

[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations