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Prions: health scare and biological challenge.


Aguzzi, A; Montrasio, F; Kaeser, P S (2001). Prions: health scare and biological challenge. Nature Reviews. Molecular Cell Biology, 2(2):118-126.

Abstract

Although human prion diseases are rare, the incidence of 'new variant' Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the United Kingdom is increasing exponentially. Given that this disease is probably the result of infection with bovine prions, understanding how prions replicate--and how to counteract their action--has become a central issue for public health. What are the links between the bovine and human prion diseases, and how do prions reach and damage the central nervous system?

Although human prion diseases are rare, the incidence of 'new variant' Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the United Kingdom is increasing exponentially. Given that this disease is probably the result of infection with bovine prions, understanding how prions replicate--and how to counteract their action--has become a central issue for public health. What are the links between the bovine and human prion diseases, and how do prions reach and damage the central nervous system?

Citations

112 citations in Web of Science®
116 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 February 2001
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:20
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1471-0072
Publisher DOI:10.1038/35052063
PubMed ID:11252953

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