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Sympathetic innervation of lymphoreticular organs is rate limiting for prion neuroinvasion


Glatzel, M; Heppner, F L; Albers, K M; Aguzzi, A (2001). Sympathetic innervation of lymphoreticular organs is rate limiting for prion neuroinvasion. Neuron, 31(1):25-34.

Abstract

Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are commonly propagated by extracerebral inoculation of the infectious agent. Indirect evidence suggests that entry into the central nervous system occurs via the peripheral nervous system. Here we have investigated the role of the sympathetic nervous system in prion neuroinvasion. Following intraperitoneal prion inoculation, chemical or immunological sympathectomy delayed or prevented scrapie. Prion titers in spinal cords were drastically reduced at early time points after inoculation. Instead, keratin 14-NGF transgenic mice, whose lymphoid organs are hyperinnervated by sympathetic nerves, showed reduction in scrapie incubation time and, unexpectedly, much higher titers of prion infectivity in spleens. We conclude that sympathetic innervation of lymphoid organs is rate limiting for prion neuroinvasion and that splenic sympathetic nerves may act as extracerebral prion reservoirs.

Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are commonly propagated by extracerebral inoculation of the infectious agent. Indirect evidence suggests that entry into the central nervous system occurs via the peripheral nervous system. Here we have investigated the role of the sympathetic nervous system in prion neuroinvasion. Following intraperitoneal prion inoculation, chemical or immunological sympathectomy delayed or prevented scrapie. Prion titers in spinal cords were drastically reduced at early time points after inoculation. Instead, keratin 14-NGF transgenic mice, whose lymphoid organs are hyperinnervated by sympathetic nerves, showed reduction in scrapie incubation time and, unexpectedly, much higher titers of prion infectivity in spleens. We conclude that sympathetic innervation of lymphoid organs is rate limiting for prion neuroinvasion and that splenic sympathetic nerves may act as extracerebral prion reservoirs.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:19 July 2001
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:20
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0896-6273
Publisher DOI:10.1016/S0896-6273(01)00331-2
Related URLs:http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0896-6273(01)00331-2
PubMed ID:11498048
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-1905

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