UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Delayed referral and gram-negative organisms increase the conversion thoracotomy rate in patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for empyema


Lardinois, D; Gock, M; Pezzetta, E; Buchli, C; Rousson, V; Furrer, M; Ris, H B (2005). Delayed referral and gram-negative organisms increase the conversion thoracotomy rate in patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for empyema. Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 79(6):1851-1856.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The role of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the treatment of pleural empyema was assessed in a consecutive series of 328 patients between 1992 and 2002. An analysis of the predicting factors for conversion thoracotomy in presumed stage II empyema was performed. METHODS: Empyema stage III with pleural thickening and signs of restriction on computer tomography imaging was treated by open decortication, whereas a thoracoscopic debridement was attempted in presumed stage II disease. Conversion thoracotomy was liberally used during thoracoscopy if stage III disease was found at surgery. Predictive factors for conversion thoracotomy were calculated in a multivariate analysis among several variables such as age, sex, time interval between onset of symptoms and surgery, involved microorganisms, and underlying cause of empyema. RESULTS: Of the 328 patients surgically treated for stage II and III empyema, 150 underwent primary open decortication for presumed stage III disease. One hundred seventy-eight patients with presumed stage II empyema underwent a video-assisted thoracoscopic approach. Of these 178 patients, thoracoscopic debridement was successful in 99 of 178 patients (56%), and conversion thoracotomy and open decortication was judged necessary in 79 of 178 patients (44%). The conversion thoracotomy rate was higher in parapneumonic empyema (55%) as compared with posttraumatic (32%) or postoperative (29%) empyema; however, delayed referral (p < 0.0001) and gram-negative microorganisms (p < 0.01) were the only significant predictors for conversion thoracotomy in a multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Video-assisted thoracoscopic debridement offers an elegant, minimally invasive approach in a number of patients with presumed stage II empyema. However, to achieve a high success rate with the video-assisted thoracoscopic approach, early referral of the patients to surgery is required. Conversion thoracotomy should be liberally used in case of chronicity, especially after delayed referral (> 2 weeks) and in the presence of gram-negative organisms.

BACKGROUND: The role of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the treatment of pleural empyema was assessed in a consecutive series of 328 patients between 1992 and 2002. An analysis of the predicting factors for conversion thoracotomy in presumed stage II empyema was performed. METHODS: Empyema stage III with pleural thickening and signs of restriction on computer tomography imaging was treated by open decortication, whereas a thoracoscopic debridement was attempted in presumed stage II disease. Conversion thoracotomy was liberally used during thoracoscopy if stage III disease was found at surgery. Predictive factors for conversion thoracotomy were calculated in a multivariate analysis among several variables such as age, sex, time interval between onset of symptoms and surgery, involved microorganisms, and underlying cause of empyema. RESULTS: Of the 328 patients surgically treated for stage II and III empyema, 150 underwent primary open decortication for presumed stage III disease. One hundred seventy-eight patients with presumed stage II empyema underwent a video-assisted thoracoscopic approach. Of these 178 patients, thoracoscopic debridement was successful in 99 of 178 patients (56%), and conversion thoracotomy and open decortication was judged necessary in 79 of 178 patients (44%). The conversion thoracotomy rate was higher in parapneumonic empyema (55%) as compared with posttraumatic (32%) or postoperative (29%) empyema; however, delayed referral (p < 0.0001) and gram-negative microorganisms (p < 0.01) were the only significant predictors for conversion thoracotomy in a multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Video-assisted thoracoscopic debridement offers an elegant, minimally invasive approach in a number of patients with presumed stage II empyema. However, to achieve a high success rate with the video-assisted thoracoscopic approach, early referral of the patients to surgery is required. Conversion thoracotomy should be liberally used in case of chronicity, especially after delayed referral (> 2 weeks) and in the presence of gram-negative organisms.

Citations

30 citations in Web of Science®
40 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 15 Jun 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2005
Deposited On:15 Jun 2009 09:36
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:16
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0003-4975
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2004.12.031
PubMed ID:15919270
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-19193

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations