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Deficient high-acceleration vestibular function in patients with polyneuropathy


Palla, A; Schmid-Priscoveanu, A; Studer, A; Hess, K; Straumann, D (2009). Deficient high-acceleration vestibular function in patients with polyneuropathy. Neurology, 72(23):2009-2013.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Unsteadiness during standing and walking is a frequent complaint of patients with polyneuropathy (PNP). OBJECTIVE: To determine whether balance disorders in patients with PNP may be caused by reduced proprioceptive input from the feet alone or whether impaired vestibular input, resulting from involvement of the vestibular nerve, can be an additional factor. METHODS: A total of 37 patients (mean age 65 years +/- 12 SD; 12 women) with electrodiagnostically confirmed PNP (predominantly axonal: 18; predominantly demyelinating: 19) underwent horizontal search-coil head-impulse testing, which assesses the high-acceleration vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). RESULTS: Relative to a healthy comparison group, the gains (eye velocity divided by head velocity) of the horizontal VOR were reduced in 27 of 37 patients (unilateral: 13; bilateral: 14). The percentages of patients with unilateral or bilateral VOR deficits were not significantly different between patients with axonal or demyelinating PNP. CONCLUSIONS: Two thirds of patients with axonal or demyelinating polyneuropathy (PNP) showed unilateral (approximately 50%) or bilateral (approximately 50%) gain reductions of the horizontal high-acceleration vestibulo-ocular reflex. This finding suggests that, in many patients with PNP, the neuropathic process includes the vestibular nerve. Such information is highly relevant for subsequent physical therapy, since vestibular exercise improves balance control and reduces disability.

BACKGROUND: Unsteadiness during standing and walking is a frequent complaint of patients with polyneuropathy (PNP). OBJECTIVE: To determine whether balance disorders in patients with PNP may be caused by reduced proprioceptive input from the feet alone or whether impaired vestibular input, resulting from involvement of the vestibular nerve, can be an additional factor. METHODS: A total of 37 patients (mean age 65 years +/- 12 SD; 12 women) with electrodiagnostically confirmed PNP (predominantly axonal: 18; predominantly demyelinating: 19) underwent horizontal search-coil head-impulse testing, which assesses the high-acceleration vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). RESULTS: Relative to a healthy comparison group, the gains (eye velocity divided by head velocity) of the horizontal VOR were reduced in 27 of 37 patients (unilateral: 13; bilateral: 14). The percentages of patients with unilateral or bilateral VOR deficits were not significantly different between patients with axonal or demyelinating PNP. CONCLUSIONS: Two thirds of patients with axonal or demyelinating polyneuropathy (PNP) showed unilateral (approximately 50%) or bilateral (approximately 50%) gain reductions of the horizontal high-acceleration vestibulo-ocular reflex. This finding suggests that, in many patients with PNP, the neuropathic process includes the vestibular nerve. Such information is highly relevant for subsequent physical therapy, since vestibular exercise improves balance control and reduces disability.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2009
Deposited On:15 Jun 2009 08:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:16
Publisher:American Academy of Neurology
ISSN:0028-3878
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181a92b7e
PubMed ID:19506223
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-19228

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