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Binding of disease-associated prion protein to plasminogen.


Fischer, M B; Roeckl, C; Parizek, P; Schwarz, H P; Aguzzi, A (2000). Binding of disease-associated prion protein to plasminogen. Nature, 408(6811):479-483.

Abstract

Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are associated with accumulation of PrP(Sc), a conformer of a cellular protein called PrP(C). PrP(Sc) is thought to replicate by imparting its conformation onto PrP(C) (ref. 1), yet conformational discrimination between PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) has remained elusive. Because deposition of PrP(Sc) alone is not enough to cause neuropathology, PrP(Sc) probably damages the brain by interacting with other cellular constituents. Here we find activities in human and mouse blood which bind PrP(Sc) and prion infectivity, but not PrP(C). We identify plasminogen, a pro-protease implicated in neuronal excitotoxicity, as a PrP(Sc)-binding protein. Binding is abolished if the conformation of PrP(Sc) is disrupted by 6M urea or guanidine. The isolated lysine binding site 1 of plasminogen (kringles I-III) retains this binding activity, and binding can be competed for with lysine. Therefore, plasminogen represents the first endogenous factor discriminating between normal and pathological prion protein. This unexpected property may be exploited for diagnostic purposes.

Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are associated with accumulation of PrP(Sc), a conformer of a cellular protein called PrP(C). PrP(Sc) is thought to replicate by imparting its conformation onto PrP(C) (ref. 1), yet conformational discrimination between PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) has remained elusive. Because deposition of PrP(Sc) alone is not enough to cause neuropathology, PrP(Sc) probably damages the brain by interacting with other cellular constituents. Here we find activities in human and mouse blood which bind PrP(Sc) and prion infectivity, but not PrP(C). We identify plasminogen, a pro-protease implicated in neuronal excitotoxicity, as a PrP(Sc)-binding protein. Binding is abolished if the conformation of PrP(Sc) is disrupted by 6M urea or guanidine. The isolated lysine binding site 1 of plasminogen (kringles I-III) retains this binding activity, and binding can be competed for with lysine. Therefore, plasminogen represents the first endogenous factor discriminating between normal and pathological prion protein. This unexpected property may be exploited for diagnostic purposes.

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163 citations in Web of Science®
174 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:23 November 2000
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:21
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0028-0836
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/35044100
PubMed ID:11100730

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