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A simple method to approximate liver size on cross-sectional images using living liver models


Muggli, D; Müller, M A; Karlo, C; Fornaro, J; Marincek, B; Frauenfelder, T (2009). A simple method to approximate liver size on cross-sectional images using living liver models. Clinical Radiology, 64(7):682-689.

Abstract

AIM: To assess whether a simple. diameter-based formula applicable to cross-sectional images can be used to calculate the total liver volume. MATERIALS AND METHODS: On 119 cross-sectional examinations (62 computed tomography and 57 magnetic resonance imaging) a simple, formula-based method to approximate the liver volume was evaluated. The total liver volume was approximated measuring the largest craniocaudal (cc), ventrodorsal (vd), and coronal (cor) diameters by two readers and implementing the equation: Vol(estimated)=cc x vd x cor x 0.31. Inter-rater reliability, agreement, and correlation between liver volume calculation and virtual liver volumetry were analysed. RESULTS: No significant disagreement between the two readers was found. The formula correlated significantly with the volumetric data (r>0.85, p<0.0001). In 81% of cases the error of the approximated volume was <10% and in 92% of cases <15% compared to the volumetric data. CONCLUSION: Total liver volume can be accurately estimated on cross-sectional images using a simple, diameter-based equation.

AIM: To assess whether a simple. diameter-based formula applicable to cross-sectional images can be used to calculate the total liver volume. MATERIALS AND METHODS: On 119 cross-sectional examinations (62 computed tomography and 57 magnetic resonance imaging) a simple, formula-based method to approximate the liver volume was evaluated. The total liver volume was approximated measuring the largest craniocaudal (cc), ventrodorsal (vd), and coronal (cor) diameters by two readers and implementing the equation: Vol(estimated)=cc x vd x cor x 0.31. Inter-rater reliability, agreement, and correlation between liver volume calculation and virtual liver volumetry were analysed. RESULTS: No significant disagreement between the two readers was found. The formula correlated significantly with the volumetric data (r>0.85, p<0.0001). In 81% of cases the error of the approximated volume was <10% and in 92% of cases <15% compared to the volumetric data. CONCLUSION: Total liver volume can be accurately estimated on cross-sectional images using a simple, diameter-based equation.

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4 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:22 Jun 2009 13:37
Last Modified:12 Sep 2016 12:05
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0009-9260
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.crad.2009.02.013
PubMed ID:19520212
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-19329

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