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Oxygenation of spontaneous canine tumors during fractionated radiation therapy


Achermann, Roger E; Ohlerth, Stefanie M; Rohrer Bley, Carla; Gassmann, Max; Inteeworn, Natalie; Roos, Malgorzata; Schärz, Myriam; Wergin, Melanie C; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara (2004). Oxygenation of spontaneous canine tumors during fractionated radiation therapy. Strahlentherapie und Onkologie, 180(5):297-305.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Tumor oxygenation predicts treatment outcome, and reoxygenation is considered important in the efficacy of fractionated radiation therapy. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to document the changes of the oxygenation status in spontaneous canine tumors during fractionated radiation therapy using polarographic needle electrodes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Tumor oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)) measurements were performed with the Eppendorf-pO(2)-Histograph. The measurements were done under general anesthesia, and probe tracks were guided with ultrasound. pO(2) was measured before radiation therapy in all dogs. In patients treated with curative intent, measurements were done sequentially up to eight times (total dose: 45-59.5 Gy). Oxygenation status of the palliative patient group was examined before each fraction of radiation therapy up to five times (total dose: 24-30 Gy). RESULTS: 15/26 tumors had a pretreatment median pO(2) < or = 10 mmHg. The pO(2) values appeared to be quite variable in individual tumors during fractionated radiation therapy. The pO(2) of initially hypoxic tumors (pretreatment median pO(2) < or = 10 mmHg) remained unchanged during fractionated radiotherapy, whereas in initially normoxic tumors the pO(2) decreased. CONCLUSION: Hypoxia is common in spontaneous canine tumors, as 57.7% of the recorded values were < or = 10 mmHg. The data of this study showed that initially hypoxic tumors remained hypoxic, whereas normoxic tumors became more hypoxic.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Tumor oxygenation predicts treatment outcome, and reoxygenation is considered important in the efficacy of fractionated radiation therapy. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to document the changes of the oxygenation status in spontaneous canine tumors during fractionated radiation therapy using polarographic needle electrodes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Tumor oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)) measurements were performed with the Eppendorf-pO(2)-Histograph. The measurements were done under general anesthesia, and probe tracks were guided with ultrasound. pO(2) was measured before radiation therapy in all dogs. In patients treated with curative intent, measurements were done sequentially up to eight times (total dose: 45-59.5 Gy). Oxygenation status of the palliative patient group was examined before each fraction of radiation therapy up to five times (total dose: 24-30 Gy). RESULTS: 15/26 tumors had a pretreatment median pO(2) < or = 10 mmHg. The pO(2) values appeared to be quite variable in individual tumors during fractionated radiation therapy. The pO(2) of initially hypoxic tumors (pretreatment median pO(2) < or = 10 mmHg) remained unchanged during fractionated radiotherapy, whereas in initially normoxic tumors the pO(2) decreased. CONCLUSION: Hypoxia is common in spontaneous canine tumors, as 57.7% of the recorded values were < or = 10 mmHg. The data of this study showed that initially hypoxic tumors remained hypoxic, whereas normoxic tumors became more hypoxic.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Oxygenierung spontaner Tumoren beim Hund unter fraktionierter Radiotherapie
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2004
Deposited On:23 Jun 2009 10:00
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:16
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0179-7158
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00066-004-1193-6
PubMed ID:15127160
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-19383

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