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Changes of circulating antibody levels induced by ABO antibody adsorption for ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation


Valli, P V; Puga Yung, G; Fehr, T; Schulz-Huotari, C; Kaup, N; Güngör, T; Ambühl, P; Weber, M; Schanz, U; Seebach, J D; Stüssi, G (2009). Changes of circulating antibody levels induced by ABO antibody adsorption for ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. American Journal of Transplantation, 9(5):1072-1080.

Abstract

ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation using immunoadsorption to remove anti-A/B antibodies has become a successful clinical practice. Since the data on the specificity of the ABO columns are controversial, the present study assessed the efficiency and specificity of the ABO immunoadsorption, the effect on total immunoglobulins and antibodies previously induced by vaccination. Anti-A/B antibodies were measured by agglutination and ABO flow cytometry, total IgG/IgM, carbohydrate- and protein-specific antibodies by nephelometry and ELISA. The first immunoadsorption not only efficiently reduced donor-specific anti-A/B IgM (81%) and IgG (56%) but also reduced compatible anti-A/B IgM (59%) and IgG (34%). The measurements of antidonor A/B antibodies by direct agglutination (IgM) or flow cytometry better represented the effective antibody levels than the indirect agglutination test (IgG). The median reduction of total IgM and total IgG levels after a single immunoadsorption was 34% and 18%, respectively. Antibodies against pneumococcus and haemophilus polysaccharide antigens were significantly reduced, whereas antitetanus and antidiphtheria protein antibodies were not affected. Intravenous immunoglobulin administration restored the protective anticarbohydrate antibody levels. In summary, immunoadsorption efficiently removed antidonor A/B antibodies, but was not specific for A/B antigens. Anti-A/B antibody levels as determined by ABO flow cytometry are useful to establish the minimal number of immunoadsorptions needed for successful ABO-incompatible transplantation.

ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation using immunoadsorption to remove anti-A/B antibodies has become a successful clinical practice. Since the data on the specificity of the ABO columns are controversial, the present study assessed the efficiency and specificity of the ABO immunoadsorption, the effect on total immunoglobulins and antibodies previously induced by vaccination. Anti-A/B antibodies were measured by agglutination and ABO flow cytometry, total IgG/IgM, carbohydrate- and protein-specific antibodies by nephelometry and ELISA. The first immunoadsorption not only efficiently reduced donor-specific anti-A/B IgM (81%) and IgG (56%) but also reduced compatible anti-A/B IgM (59%) and IgG (34%). The measurements of antidonor A/B antibodies by direct agglutination (IgM) or flow cytometry better represented the effective antibody levels than the indirect agglutination test (IgG). The median reduction of total IgM and total IgG levels after a single immunoadsorption was 34% and 18%, respectively. Antibodies against pneumococcus and haemophilus polysaccharide antigens were significantly reduced, whereas antitetanus and antidiphtheria protein antibodies were not affected. Intravenous immunoglobulin administration restored the protective anticarbohydrate antibody levels. In summary, immunoadsorption efficiently removed antidonor A/B antibodies, but was not specific for A/B antigens. Anti-A/B antibody levels as determined by ABO flow cytometry are useful to establish the minimal number of immunoadsorptions needed for successful ABO-incompatible transplantation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nephrology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Hematology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:22 Jun 2009 15:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:16
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1600-6135
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1600-6143.2009.02579.x
PubMed ID:19344433
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-19388

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