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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-19399

Aguzzi, A; Theuring, F (1994). Improved in situ beta-galactosidase staining for histological analysis of transgenic mice. Histochemistry and Cell Biology, 102(6):477-481.

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Abstract

The present study describes a novel method for the histochemical demonstration of beta-galactosidase activity on tissue sections. We have replaced 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactoside (X-Gal) with 5-bromo-indolyl-beta-o-galactopyranoside (Bluo-Gal) as a chromogenic substrate for the bacterial beta-galactosidase (lacZ). After beta-galactosidic cleavage, Bluo-Gal precipitates in form of fine birefringent crystals, whereas X-gal gives rise to an amorphous precipitate. Upon microscopic examination under polarized light, the crystals emit a strong signal consisting of yellow reflected light. This property of Bluo-Gal results in greatly enhanced sensitivity of the staining method for beta-galactosidase and allows for optimal morphological resolution. To exemplify the applications of this technique, the expression is demonstrated in transgenic mice of beta-galactosidase driven by a fragment of the human tissue-type plasminogen activator promoter.

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29 citations in Web of Science®
25 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1994
Deposited On:23 Jun 2009 09:17
Last Modified:09 Dec 2013 17:23
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0948-6143
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/BF00269579
PubMed ID:7535299

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