UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The influence of extracellular matrix derived from skeletal muscle tissue on the proliferation and differentiation of myogenic progenitor cells ex vivo


Stern, M M; Myers, R L; Hammam, N; Stern, K A; Eberli, D; Kritchevsky, S B; Soker, S; Van Dyke, M (2009). The influence of extracellular matrix derived from skeletal muscle tissue on the proliferation and differentiation of myogenic progenitor cells ex vivo. Biomaterials, 30(12):2393-2399.

Abstract

Skeletal muscle relies upon regeneration to maintain homeostasis and repair injury. This process involves the recruitment of the tissue's resident stem cell, the muscle progenitor cell, and a subsequent proliferative response by newly generated myoblasts, which must then align and fuse to generate new muscle fibers. During regeneration, cells rely on environmental input for direction. Extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a crucial component of a cell's microenvironment that aids in guiding muscle regeneration. We hypothesized that ECM extracted from skeletal muscle would provide muscle progenitor cells and myoblasts with an ideal substrate for growth and differentiation ex vivo. To test this hypothesis, we developed a method to extract ECM from the large thigh muscles of adult rats and present it to cells as a surface coating. Myogenic cells cultured on ECM extract experienced enhanced proliferation and differentiation relative to standard growth surfaces. As the methodology can be applied to any size muscle, these results demonstrate that bioactive ECM can be readily obtained from skeletal muscle and used to develop biomaterials that enhance muscle regeneration. Furthermore, the model system demonstrated here can be applied to the study of interactions between the ECM of a particular tissue and a cell population of interest.

Skeletal muscle relies upon regeneration to maintain homeostasis and repair injury. This process involves the recruitment of the tissue's resident stem cell, the muscle progenitor cell, and a subsequent proliferative response by newly generated myoblasts, which must then align and fuse to generate new muscle fibers. During regeneration, cells rely on environmental input for direction. Extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a crucial component of a cell's microenvironment that aids in guiding muscle regeneration. We hypothesized that ECM extracted from skeletal muscle would provide muscle progenitor cells and myoblasts with an ideal substrate for growth and differentiation ex vivo. To test this hypothesis, we developed a method to extract ECM from the large thigh muscles of adult rats and present it to cells as a surface coating. Myogenic cells cultured on ECM extract experienced enhanced proliferation and differentiation relative to standard growth surfaces. As the methodology can be applied to any size muscle, these results demonstrate that bioactive ECM can be readily obtained from skeletal muscle and used to develop biomaterials that enhance muscle regeneration. Furthermore, the model system demonstrated here can be applied to the study of interactions between the ECM of a particular tissue and a cell population of interest.

Citations

54 citations in Web of Science®
56 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

6 downloads since deposited on 03 Jul 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Urological Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2009
Deposited On:03 Jul 2009 13:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:17
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0142-9612
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2008.12.069
PubMed ID:19168212
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-19534

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations