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Time to exhaustion at maximal lactate steady state is similar for cycling and running in moderately trained subjects


Fontana, P; Boutellier, U; Knöpfli-Lenzin, C (2009). Time to exhaustion at maximal lactate steady state is similar for cycling and running in moderately trained subjects. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 107(2):187-192.

Abstract

We compared time to exhaustion (t (lim)) at maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) between cycling and running, investigated if oxygen consumption, ventilation, blood lactate concentration, and perceived exertion differ between the exercise modes, and established whether MLSS can be determined for cycling and running using the same criteria. MLSS was determined in 15 moderately trained men (30 +/- 6 years, 77 +/- 6 kg) by several constant-load tests to exhaustion in cycling and running. Heart rate, oxygen consumption, and ventilation were recorded continuously. Blood lactate concentration and perceived exertion were measured every 5 min. t (lim) (37.7 +/- 8.9 vs. 34.4 +/- 5.4 min) and perceived exertion (7.2 +/- 1.7 vs. 7.2 +/- 1.5) were similar for cycling and running. Heart rate (165 +/- 8 vs. 175 +/- 10 min(-1); P < 0.01), oxygen consumption (3.1 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.4 +/- 0.3 l min(-1); P < 0.001) and ventilation (93 +/- 12 vs. 103 +/- 16 l min(-1); P < 0.01) were lower for cycling compared to running, respectively, whereas blood lactate concentration (5.6 +/- 1.7 vs. 4.3 +/- 1.3 mmol l(-1); P < 0.05) was higher for cycling. t (lim) at MLSS is similar for cycling and running, despite absolute differences in heart rate, ventilation, blood lactate concentration, and oxygen consumption. This may be explained by the relatively equal cardiorespiratory demand at MLSS. Additionally, the similar t (lim) for cycling and running allows the same criteria to be used for determining MLSS in both exercise modes.

We compared time to exhaustion (t (lim)) at maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) between cycling and running, investigated if oxygen consumption, ventilation, blood lactate concentration, and perceived exertion differ between the exercise modes, and established whether MLSS can be determined for cycling and running using the same criteria. MLSS was determined in 15 moderately trained men (30 +/- 6 years, 77 +/- 6 kg) by several constant-load tests to exhaustion in cycling and running. Heart rate, oxygen consumption, and ventilation were recorded continuously. Blood lactate concentration and perceived exertion were measured every 5 min. t (lim) (37.7 +/- 8.9 vs. 34.4 +/- 5.4 min) and perceived exertion (7.2 +/- 1.7 vs. 7.2 +/- 1.5) were similar for cycling and running. Heart rate (165 +/- 8 vs. 175 +/- 10 min(-1); P < 0.01), oxygen consumption (3.1 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.4 +/- 0.3 l min(-1); P < 0.001) and ventilation (93 +/- 12 vs. 103 +/- 16 l min(-1); P < 0.01) were lower for cycling compared to running, respectively, whereas blood lactate concentration (5.6 +/- 1.7 vs. 4.3 +/- 1.3 mmol l(-1); P < 0.05) was higher for cycling. t (lim) at MLSS is similar for cycling and running, despite absolute differences in heart rate, ventilation, blood lactate concentration, and oxygen consumption. This may be explained by the relatively equal cardiorespiratory demand at MLSS. Additionally, the similar t (lim) for cycling and running allows the same criteria to be used for determining MLSS in both exercise modes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:24 June 2009
Deposited On:10 Jul 2009 14:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:17
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1439-6319
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00421-009-1111-9
PubMed ID:19551404
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-19580

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