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Comparative functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster proteomes


Schrimpf, S P; Weiss, M; Reiter, L; Ahrens, C H; Jovanovic, M; Malmström, J; Brunner, E; Mohanty, S; Lercher, M J; Hunziker, P E; Aebersold, R; von Mering, C; Hengartner, M O (2009). Comparative functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster proteomes. PLoS Biology, 7(3):e48.

Abstract

The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a popular model system in genetics, not least because a majority of human disease genes are conserved in C. elegans. To generate a comprehensive inventory of its expressed proteome, we performed extensive shotgun proteomics and identified more than half of all predicted C. elegans proteins. This allowed us to confirm and extend genome annotations, characterize the role of operons in C. elegans, and semiquantitatively infer abundance levels for thousands of proteins. Furthermore, for the first time to our knowledge, we were able to compare two animal proteomes (C. elegans and Drosophila melanogaster). We found that the abundances of orthologous proteins in metazoans correlate remarkably well, better than protein abundance versus transcript abundance within each organism or transcript abundances across organisms; this suggests that changes in transcript abundance may have been partially offset during evolution by opposing changes in protein abundance.

The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a popular model system in genetics, not least because a majority of human disease genes are conserved in C. elegans. To generate a comprehensive inventory of its expressed proteome, we performed extensive shotgun proteomics and identified more than half of all predicted C. elegans proteins. This allowed us to confirm and extend genome annotations, characterize the role of operons in C. elegans, and semiquantitatively infer abundance levels for thousands of proteins. Furthermore, for the first time to our knowledge, we were able to compare two animal proteomes (C. elegans and Drosophila melanogaster). We found that the abundances of orthologous proteins in metazoans correlate remarkably well, better than protein abundance versus transcript abundance within each organism or transcript abundances across organisms; this suggests that changes in transcript abundance may have been partially offset during evolution by opposing changes in protein abundance.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Functional Genomics Center Zurich
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Life Sciences
08 University Research Priority Programs > Systems Biology / Functional Genomics
08 University Research Priority Programs > Systems Biology / Functional Genomics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:27 Jul 2009 07:10
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:18
Publisher:Public Library of Science (PLoS)
ISSN:1544-9173
Publisher DOI:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000048
PubMed ID:19260763
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-19790

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